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Committed suicide
www.democracynow.org
AMY GOODMAN:   First I want to offer my condolences and the whole team, the whole staff here at Democracy Now! we are very moved by the fact that you were willing to come in to talk about Jeff.   Can you tell us when he went to Iraq?
KEVIN LUCEY:   He went to-he was deployed over to Camp Pendleton in late January of 2003 and he was shipped out to Iraq, I believe it was mid February of 2003.
AMY GOODMAN:   Why did he go into the military?
KEVIN LUCEY:   He signed up for the Marine Reserves because he wanted the training and he wanted to go to college.
AMY GOODMAN:   How did you feel about that?
Jeffrey Lucey
KEVIN LUCEY:   Both of us, I think, were in a state of shock.
JOYCE LUCEY:   At the time?   He was 18.
AMY GOODMAN:   18 years old.   Did he tell you about this decision when he was still in high school?
JOYCE LUCEY:   No.  He might have mentioned it a couple of times, but I would never have taken him seriously at the time.
AMY GOODMAN:   Where did Jeff grow up?
JOYCE LUCEY:   Belcher Town.
AMY GOODMAN:   Here in Massachusetts.   So he went off to Iraq. And he served there how long?
KEVIN LUCEY:   Well, he was there for the [beginning of the] war.  He celebrated his 22nd birthday over in Iraq.  In fact, the war started the day after his 22nd birthday.  And then he returned back to this country July 14 of 2003.
JOYCE LUCEY:   When he first came home, he was happy to be home.  He had a couple of weddings to attend.  But his girlfriend, they went away to the Cape right after they came back and she said he was vague...he was distant.  You know.  You really wouldn't notice it unless you knew Jeffrey.
His unit never saw anything coming.  They thought he was smiling all the time, he was cooperative.  Never, never saw the pain that was underneath.
KEVIN LUCEY:   And then there was Christmas Eve that we really became, aware of the problem when he was drunk and he told his younger sister that he was a murderer.
And his behavior broke.
He usually would be at family events but he refused to come with us Christmas Eve down to his grandparents and our daughter went to check on him and we went rushing back home Christmas Eve and we knew that something was going on.
We didn't understand.
Son commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:    He was in the battle of Nazaria?
JOYCE LUCEY:     Yes.  He went in with Special Opps.  He was with the, with the ones that need self truckers to drive them in and Jeff went in with them.
And then he went into the city itself.
And he was in the alleyways, he said they were firing from the top of buildings down at them and he thought he was going to die there.
He really... and he said we would never understand.
And we don't.  I can't put myself in the position he was in.
AMY GOODMAN:    Was your son political when he went to Iraq?
KEVIN LUCEY:    As time went on, he really started watching various news programs and he started speaking up against the war and why it was being fought, why innocents were being killed.
He just couldn't...he couldn't merge his life with what he had seen and what he had gone through.
And he started telling us, as time went on, a lot more of what he saw, what he saw Americans do.
And...just...he just had some really heavy trauma.
Comforts friend
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  So when he came back, what kind of help did he get?   What date did he return home?
JOYCE LUCEY:  July 13 or 14 [2003]
AMY GOODMAN:  What help did he get in the summer?   This was last—
JOYCE LUCEY: He didn't seek any help at that time.
AMY GOODMAN:  And you realized something was wrong already at Christmas?
JOYCE LUCEY: Around Christmas.
AMY GOODMAN:  Six months later.
JOYCE LUCEY: Around Christmas eve.
AMY GOODMAN:  Then what happened?
JOYCE LUCEY: Yep, he would have a good day and a bad day.
It was nothing...we didn't even understand that he was going through something.
He went back it school, he seemed to focus again on his work.
In fact, he had his midterms in March and he did very well.
It was around April he started feeling anxious, felt hike there were people watching him, like when he would walk into a class classroom.
He felt all eyes were on him.
Even Though he said he knows they aren't. [He said] I never felt like this before.
If somebody would slam a door, he would drop his school books down and he said he would turn real quick and was embarrassed.
It was a startle reflex.
He didn't quite understand what was going on.
He was having trouble sleeping, he was having night sweats, the nightmares were starting to occur.
He was agitated, restless.
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  Did the military veteran’s hospital say this is what could happen?
KEVIN LUCEY:  Well we had not hooked up with a V.A. yet.
What it happened was that during a family day that people were told you should try to get your vet some help.
And one of the things was that Jeff didn't want help.
Because he thought he could manage everything on his own.
And then when we got into may, well even late April, both of us started encouraging him to go to his open private therapist.
He was tremendously worried about the military finding out that he was, quote, and ‘weak.’
We did it privately.
We hooked him up with a therapist over in Amherst and he immediately trusted Mark because he knew Mark from earlier and what had happened was we thought things were working out.
Mark was giving him phone consultation and seeing him once or twice a week.
But then when May came, things really started exploding.
He started talking about how we could never understand and he would average maybe three or four or five hours' worth of sleep.
23 year old commits suicide
JOYCE LUCEY:  He wasn't eating.
KEVIN LUCEY:  He wasn't eating.
JOYCE LUCEY:  And when he returned, he was almost phoning on a daily bases when he first came home and it kind of continued.
He went to see the internist at the time and he really, he didn't find anything wrong with Jeff at that point.
AMY GOODMAN:  Did you ever seek V.A. help?
JOYCE LUCEY:  Yes.
KEVIN LUCEY:  We did go out to the V.A.
We were trying to get him to do it voluntarily.  So about three weeks in May, we kept encouraging him and he said “OK, tomorrow, I’ll go.  Tomorrow I’ll go.”
Well finally on May 28, Memorial Day weekend, I came home and I said, ‘Jeff, today is the day.’ And he, his girlfriend and myself, brought him up to the V.A. hospital.
We left at 3:00 on May 28, Friday.  We got there at 4:00 and they tried to talk him into a voluntary.
Jeff was medicating himself with the alcohol.
No, he had not drank anything from 3:00 on and about 7:00 or 7:30 when they took a breathalyzer and he blew a .238.
He was functioning very well except very angry.
Finally, I had to ask them to involuntarily commit him.
And that resulted in his being chased by the V.A. police and male nurses tackled, restrained, and he was committed against his will until June 1, Tuesday.
And then they discharged him.
One of the things about that that upsets me is that on Saturday, I called and a nurse went down and asked them, Jeff, because of Hippocratic Oath, I can't speak to your dad.
And he said, “No, it's ok. Talk to him.”
So she came back and told us how he had the night before, but during his stay, he had mentioned, we got the medical records afterwards, he had mentioned three ways that he was thinking about committing suicide.  Overdose, suffocation or hanging.
And at his discharge meeting, which we thought possibility someone would contact us, Jeff called his mom and said I’ve been discharged.  Come and get me.
So we were never told that he had these kinds of really construct plans.  And....
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  What date did he die?
KEVIN LUCEY: He died June 22, 2004. Yeah. He died Tuesday, five weeks ago today.
AMY GOODMAN:  At home?
KEVIN LUCEY:    Yes.  He...I came home at 6:45 and I went to look for Jeff and I couldn't find him in the house.
His Iraqi dog tags were on his bed: two men that he was ordered to shoot unarmed.
And when I saw those, it didn't strike me right away, but as I walked back, I saw the cellar door open, cellar light on, family pictures put in a crescent.
I went downstairs looking at the pictures and all of a sudden from the corner of my eye, I saw my son Jeff hanging there from a hold.
And I immediately went over and cradled him on my knee, took the hose from his neck and made a pillow out of a thing and rested him down and called the police.
And that was that.
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  You said he put dog tags on his bed of Iraqis?
JOYCE LUCEY:  WHe wore them on...he had them in Iraq and when he came home, he started wearing them.
And the psychologist that was dealing with Jeff said Jeff wore them to honor these men, not as a trophy, but to honor them because he took their lives.
AMY GOODMAN:  What do you mean he was ordered to shoot them and they were unarmed?
JOYCE LUCEY:  They were prisoners.
AMY GOODMAN:  They were prisoners?
JOYCE LUCEY:  Yeah.
AMY GOODMAN:  Where did he kill them?   In Nazariah?
KEVIN LUCEY:  We don't know.
JOYCE LUCEY:  We don’t have the whole story.
He would just give bits and pieces.
You would never get the full.  But he told his sister that he was just like five feet away from one of them.
That he had to kill.  And he watched him die.  And....
23 year old commits suicide
KEVIN LUCEY:  He never shot a squirrel before.  In his life.
AMY GOODMAN:  He's the middle son?   You have a daughter are older and younger?
JOYCE LUCEY:  Yes.
AMY GOODMAN:  He's the middle son?   You have a daughter are older and younger?
JOYCE LUCEY:  Difficult.  Very difficult.
We just had my husband's birthday and we went out so that we wouldn't be at home, because it's too many memories at home.
And just going into a place to eat, my older daughter are kept tearing up because Jeff’s not there anymore.
So, you know, it's going to be hard for a while.
  Fallujah
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  Nancy Lessin as you listen to the Lucey's, Military Families Speak Out, your organization, you are dealing with many people who have lost loved ones.
And you are dealing also with another story right now of a young man who like Jeff was horrified at what he saw.
Please tell us the story.
NANCY LESSIN:  You know Amy, we are not hearing nearly enough about those who die in the battle field.
We are hearing virtually nothing about the growing number of troops who died in their souls because of what they saw and what they did.
And we hear these every day.
But this one in particular is one that we heard last week.
A mom wrote us.
Her son served in Iraq.
He came back.  Was suffering nightmares and night sweats.
Got redeployment orders and he told his mother he could not go back and kill innocent people.
She encouraged him to talk with his command, with his chaplain.
He did that.
They told him to suck it up, get back to his unit, and do his damn job.
Instead of going on deployment, he went AWOL for several months and then he turned himself in.
Back into his command he was put in the brig where he sits now in Camp Pendleton.
He's being held without charges and incommunicado from his family.
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  His parents can't talk with him?
NANCY LESSIN:  No.  They have not been able to.
We are trying to get legal intervention here, but clearly this is just yet another story that illustrates a trend that it's really military policy that is limiting and preventing proper evaluation diagnosis and treatment of PTSD.  We have heard—
AMY GOODMAN:  Post-traumatic stress disorder.
NANCY LESSIN:  How much the post traumatic stress disorder.
We have heard so much about what this military learned in Vietnam and how they are doing it differently now.
And we don't see that at all.
We see the same mistakes happening, mistakes that are, in fact, not mistakes at all.
It's really a way of denying this issue so that they can keep as many warm bodies on the front, deployed and redeployed.
And that's the policy.
23 year old commits suicide
AMY GOODMAN:  Kelly Dougherty, you served in Iraq for about a year?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  Yes.   With the Colorado National Guard.
AMY GOODMAN:  You were in Nazariah like Jeff?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  Yes.
AMY GOODMAN:  But did you know him?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  No.  When our unit went, it was after the majority of the fighting had stopped.  So....
AMY GOODMAN:  Were you opposed to the invasion?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  I was opposed to the invasion and the more I have learned and what I saw, it's just reinforced what I felt.
AMY GOODMAN:  Why did you join the Colorado National Guard?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  I joined out of high school to get money for college and also to get some medical training.
I was served as a medic and then I went to Iraq as a military police officer.
AMY GOODMAN:  So you've come home, I met you at the Boston Public Library at the closing of the Veterans for Peace Conference. And learned that a small group of you, veterans from Iraq, have formed this organization Iraq Veterans Against the War.  Why?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  We formed it just to give returning Iraqi veterans who are disillusioned and angry with the government and with this war in Iraq a way to come together and organize a voice.
Because we think it's powerful to have returning veterans especially who have seen what it is like over there, speak against it.
And we are working with Nancy and Military Families Speak Out and with Veterans for Peace to organize.
We have members of our group who dealt with similar situations like she was talking about and what their son went through with depression and PTSD and getting no help from the government and from the military.
And we have people there that have experienced it.
AMY GOODMAN:  If people want to get in touch with Iraq Veterans Against the War, where can they go?
KELLY DOUGHERTY:  Yes, we are at www.ivaw.net.
And we plan to get together and speak out, try to make our voices heard.
We have several members, our membership has already tripled since we announced this three days ago.
AMY GOODMAN:  Kevin lucey, do you think that this would have helped your son?
KEVIN LUCEY:  I believe it would have helped him and would have given him a lifeline.
AMY GOODMAN:  I want to thank you all very much for being with us and we hope to be in touch with you as you go through your recovery and your mourning and to find out how Iraq Veterans Against the War and Military Families Speak Out are doing and how you are organizing in this election year.
www.democracynow.org
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq — Most Recent
Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the US 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.   Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013
Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.   More than 6,500 veteran suicides are logged every year — more than the total number of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since those wars began.
Mary Coghill Kirkland said she asked her son, 21-year-old Army Spc. Derrick Kirkland, what was wrong as soon as he came back from his first deployment to Iraq in 2008.   He had a ready answer: "Mom, I'm a murderer."
A military base on the brink
As police agents watched he shot himself in the head
Murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug overdoses
 
USA 2006
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.

Vietnam Veterans dying before their time.

I had three friends die as a result of being in Vietnam. 

The last one committed suicide in January 2006.

He hung himself in a motel room.

The silent suicides.

Iraq Veterans will be no different.

I believe betrayal is the number one cause.

When I came back from Vietnam, my entire belief system was dismantled.

My greatest awareness from Vietnam, was the realization that I was the enemy in Vietnam.

All I saw in Vietnam was poor people.

And those poor people hated us.

Vietnam became free, when the last American left Vietnam.

The entire Vietnam War was a fucking lie.

From A-----------------to------------------Z.

Words and photo: Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Vietnam Veterans dying before their time.
I had three friends die as a result of being in Vietnam. 
The last one committed suicide in January 2006.
He hung himself in a motel room.
The silent suicides.
Iraq Veterans will be no different.
I believe betrayal is the number one cause.
When I came back from Vietnam, my entire belief system was dismantled.
My greatest awareness from Vietnam, was the realization that I was the enemy in Vietnam.
All I saw in Vietnam was poor people.
And those poor people hated us.
Vietnam became free, when the last American left Vietnam.
The entire Vietnam War was a fucking lie.
From A-----------------to------------------Z.
Words and photo:
Mike Hastie Vietnam Veteran
Vietnam — National Security Agency officers deliberately distorted critical intelligence to cover up their mistakes.
Communications intercepted by the N.S.A., the secretive eavesdropping and code-breaking agency, were falsified so that they made it look as if North Vietnam had attacked American destroyers on Aug. 4, 1964, two days after a previous clash.
President Lyndon B. Johnson cited the supposed attack to persuade Congress to authorize broad military action in Vietnam, but most historians have concluded in recent years that there was no second attack.
N.S.A. historian, Robert J. Hanyok, found a pattern of translation mistakes that went uncorrected, altered intercept times and selective citation of intelligence that persuaded him that midlevel agency officers had deliberately skewed the evidence.
"Rather than come clean about their mistake, they helped launch the United States into a bloody war that would last for 10 years," Matthew M. Aid, an independent historian said he had decided to speak publicly about the findings because he believed they should have been released long ago.
Robert S. McNamara, who as defense secretary played a central role in the Tonkin Gulf affair, said in an interview last week that he believed the intelligence reports had played a decisive role in the war's expansion.
   www.toledoblade.com      Toledo Blade Pulitzer prizewinning four day feature exposing Vietnam atrocities    
   October 2003    Failed Justice   
Image: Toledo Blade
The Tiger Force case is closed with no one charged.
Demons of past stalk Tiger Force veterans
For Barry Bowman, the images return at night.
The elderly man praying on his knees.   The officer pointing a rifle at the man's head.  
The shot.  
That piercing shot.  
Before it's over, the old man drops to the ground — his body twitching in the blood-soaked grass.  
Over and over, Mr. Bowman relives the execution of the Vietnamese villager known as Dao Hue.
Despite years of therapy, the former Tiger Force soldier is still deeply troubled by the brutal shooting he witnessed as a young medic in the Song Ve Valley.
He's not alone.
Of the 43 former platoon members interviewed by The Blade in an eight-month investigation of Tiger Force, a dozen expressed remorse for committing or failing to stop atrocities.
They share some of the same symptoms — flashbacks or nightmares — and over the past 36 years have sought counseling, they said.
Nine have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, a psychiatric condition that can occur following life-threatening experiences.
To this day, they wrestle with memories of Tiger Force's rampage through more than 40 hamlets in the Central Highlands of South Vietnam in 1967....
John Kerry's 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War Before the United States Senate.
JOHN KERRY:  Several months ago in Detroit, we had an investigation at which over 150 honorably discharged and many very highly decorated veterans testified to war crimes committed in Southeast Asia.
Not isolated incidents, but crimes committed on a day-to-day basis with a full awareness of officers at all levels of command.
It's impossible to describe to you exactly what did happen in Detroit.
The emotions in the room, the feelings of the men who were reliving their experiences in Vietnam.
But they did.
They relived the absolute horror of what this country, in a sense, made them do.
They told the stories of times that they had personally raped.
Cut off the ears.
Cut off heads.
Taped wires from portable telephones to human genitals and turned up the power.
Cut off limbs.
Blown up bodies.
Randomly shot at civilians.
Razed villages in the fashion reminiscent of Genghis Khan.
Shot cattle and dogs for fun.
Poisoned food stocks.
And generally ravaged the countryside of South Vietnam in addition to the normal ravage of war and the normal and very particular ravaging which is done by the applied bombing power of this country.
I have photographed many items left at the ' Wall ' in Washington, D.C. and also at the ' Moving Wall ' in different locations around the Pacific Northwest.

But, the Crisco can left at the ' Moving Wall ' in Albany,  Oregon was the most profound statement of any picture I have taken. 

I have taken many grief images, but the Crisco can tells the absolute  truth about the Vietnam War. It cuts through all the bull shit and the thousands of books written about that war.

The entire Vietnam War was a fucking lie!!  The U.S. Government fucked every soldier who served in Vietnam, but at least they were decent enough to use Crisco.

Betrayal was the ultimate wound that was inflicted on every Vietnam Veteran, whether they know it or not. We were used like pawns in a chess game, and discarded like paper cups after a movie.

When I left Vietnam, guys were burning their uniforms, and writing hateful graffiti about Richard Nixon on the walls of the trancient barracks.

That is what we brought home to America, and thousands of Vietnam Veterans have committed suicide because they were
brutally betrayed by their own government.

The Crisco can says it all. The veteran who left that truth at the
We called this investigation the Winter Soldier Investigation.
The term ‘winter soldier’ is a play on words of Thomas Paine's in 1776 when he spoke of the “sunshine patriot and summertime soldiers” who deserted at Valley Forge because the going was rough.
I have photographed many items left at the ' Wall ' in Washington, D.C. and also at the ' Moving Wall ' in different locations around the Pacific Northwest.
But, the Crisco can left at the ' Moving Wall ' in Albany, Oregon was the most profound statement of any picture I have taken.
I have taken many grief images, but the Crisco can tells the absolute  truth about the Vietnam War.
It cuts through all the bull shit and the thousands of books written about that war.
The entire Vietnam War was a fucking lie!!
The U.S. Government fucked every soldier who served in Vietnam, but at least they were decent enough to use Crisco.
Betrayal was the ultimate wound that was inflicted on every Vietnam Veteran, whether they know it or not.
We were used like pawns in a chess game, and discarded like paper cups after a movie.
When I left Vietnam, guys were burning their uniforms, and writing hateful graffiti about Richard Nixon on the walls of the trancient barracks.
That is what we brought home to America, and thousands of Vietnam Veterans have committed suicide because they were brutally betrayed by their own government.
The Crisco can says it all.
The veteran who left that truth at the " Wall," validated me to the max.
It forced me to see all the anger I was still hiding.
It was a powerful moment in my life.
It helped me to see I wasn't crazy.
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of profit.
Mike Hastie Vietnam Veteran
"Send guys to war, they come home talking dirty."
Tim O'Brien — The Things They Carried
John Kerry's 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
We who have come here to Washington have come here because we feel we have to be winter soldiers now.
We could come back to this country and we could be quiet.
We could hold our silence.
We could not tell what went on in Vietnam.
But we feel because of what threatens this country, the fact that the crimes threaten it, not reds, not red coats, but the crimes which we are committing are what threaten it, and we have to speak out.
I would like to talk to you a little bit about what the result is of the feelings these men carry with them after coming back from Vietnam.
The country doesn't know it yet, but it's created a monster.
A monster in the form of millions of men who have been taught to deal and to trade in violence and who are given the chance to die for the biggest nothing in history.
Men who have returned with a sense of anger and a sense of betrayal which no one has yet grasped.
As a veteran and one who feels this anger, I would like to talk about it.
We are angry because we feel we have been used in the worst fashion by the administration of this country.
The Vietnam turnout was good as well
No amount of spin can conceal Iraqis' hostility to US occupation
Sami Ramadani
Tuesday February 1, 2005
The Guardian
On September 4 1967 the New York Times published an upbeat story on presidential elections held by the South Vietnamese puppet regime at the height of the Vietnam war.
Under the heading "US encouraged by Vietnam vote: Officials cite 83% turnout despite Vietcong terror", the paper reported that the Americans had been "surprised and heartened" by the size of the turnout "despite a Vietcong terrorist campaign to disrupt the voting".
A successful election, it went on, "has long been seen as the keystone in President Johnson's policy of encouraging the growth of constitutional processes in South Vietnam".
The echoes of this weekend's propaganda about Iraq's elections are so close as to be uncanny.
Two Vietnamese girls playing a game with small rocks in holes.

God only knows how many of these small children were murdered by American weapons during the Vietnam War.

The U.S. Government bombed and fired artillery rounds at everything.

Nothing, absolutely nothing was off limits.

War crimes?

Jesus Christ.........

Mike Hastie
U.S. Army Medic
Vietnam 1970-71

Two Vietnamese girls playing a game with small rocks in holes.
God only knows how many of these small children were murdered by American weapons during the Vietnam War.
The U.S. Government bombed and fired artillery rounds at everything.
Nothing, absolutely nothing was off limits.
War crimes?
Jesus Christ.........
Photo and words: Mike Hastie
U.S. Army Medic
Vietnam 1970-71
Image inserted by TheWE.cc
With the past few days' avalanche of spin, you could be forgiven for thinking that on January 30 2005 the US-led occupation of Iraq ended and the people won their freedom and democratic rights.
Occupation, martial law, a US-appointed election commission and secret candidates
This has been a multi-layered campaign, reminiscent of the pre-war WMD frenzy and fantasies about the flowers Iraqis were collecting to throw at the invasion forces.
How you could square the words democracy, free and fair with the brutal reality of occupation, martial law, a US-appointed election commission and secret candidates has rarely been allowed to get in the way of the hype.
If truth is the first casualty of war, reliable numbers must be the first casualty of an occupation-controlled election.
Overwhelming majority of Iraqis participated?
The second layer of spin has been designed to convince us that an overwhelming majority of Iraqis participated.
The initial claim of 72% having voted was quickly downgraded to 57% of those registered to vote.
So what percentage of the adult population is registered to vote?
The Iraqi ambassador in London was unable to enlighten me.
In fact, as UN sources confirm, there has been no registration or published list of electors — all we are told is that about 14 million people were entitled to vote.
As for Iraqis abroad, the up to 4 million strong exiled community (with perhaps a little over 2 million entitled to vote) produced a 280,000 registration figure.
Of those, 265,000 actually voted.
First step to kicking out the occupiers
The Iraqi south, more religious than Baghdad, responded positively to Grand Ayatollah al-Sistani's position: to call the bluff of the US and vote for a list that was proclaimed to be hostile to the occupation.
Sistani's supporters declared that voting on Sunday was the first step to kicking out the occupiers.
The months ahead will put these declarations to a severe test.
Meanwhile Moqtada al-Sadr's popular movement, which rejected the elections as a sham, is likely to make a comeback in its open resistance to the occupation.
The big vote in Kurdistan primarily reflects the Kurdish people's demand for national self-determination.
The US administration has hitherto clamped down on these pressures.
Kissinger
Henry Kissinger's recent proposal to divide Iraq into three states reflects a major shift among influential figures in the US who, led by Kissinger as secretary of state, ditched the Kurds in the 70s and brokered a deal between Saddam and the Shah of Iran.
George Bush and Tony Blair made heroic speeches on Sunday implying that Iraqis had voted to approve the occupation. Those who insist that the US is desperate for an exit strategy are misreading its intentions.
Install and back long-term puppet regime
The facts on the ground, including the construction of massive military bases in Iraq, indicate that the US is digging in to install and back a long-term puppet regime.
For this reason, the US-led presence will continue, with all that entails in terms of bloodshed and destruction.
In the run-up to the poll, much of the western media presented it as a high-noon shootout between the terrorist Zarqawi and the Iraqi people, with the occupation forces doing their best to enable the people to defeat the fiendish, one-legged Jordanian murderer.
In reality, Zarqawi-style sectarian violence is not only condemned by Iraqis across the political spectrum, including supporters of the resistance, but is widely seen as having had a blind eye turned to it by the occupation authorities.
Negroponte backing terror gangs in central America in the 80s
Such attitudes are dismissed by outsiders, but the record of John Negroponte, the US ambassador in Baghdad, of backing terror gangs in central America in the 80s has fuelled these fears, as has Seymour Hirsh's reports on the Pentagon's assassination squads and enthusiasm for the "Salvador option".
An honest analysis of the social and political map of Iraq reveals that Iraqis are increasingly united in their determination to end the occupation.
Whether they participated in or boycotted Sunday's exercise, this political bond will soon reassert itself — just as it did in Vietnam — despite tactical differences, and despite the US-led occupation's attempts to dominate Iraqis by inflaming sectarian and ethnic divisions.
· Sami Ramadani was a political refugee from Saddam Hussein's regime and is a senior lecturer at London Metropolitan University
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2005
John Kerry's 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
In 1970, at West Point, Vice President Agnew said, “Some glamorize the criminal misfits of society while our best men die in Asian rice paddies to preserve the freedoms which those misfits abuse.
And this was used as a rallying point for our effort in Vietnam.
But for us, his boys in Asia, whom the country was supposed to support, his statement as a terrible distortion from which we can only draw a very deep sense of revulsion and hence the anger of some of the men who are here in Washington today.
It's a distortion because we in no way considered ourselves the best men of this country.
Because those he calls misfits were standing up for us in a way that nobody else in this country dared to.
Because so many who have died would have returned to this country to join the misfits in their efforts to ask for an immediate withdrawal from South Vietnam.
Because so many of those best men have returned as quadriplegics and amputees and they lie forgotten, in Veterans' Administration hospitals in this country, which fly the flag, which so many have chosen as their own personal symbol.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War
And we cannot consider ourselves America's best men when we were ashamed of and hated what we were called on to do in Southeast Asia.
In our opinion, and from our experience, there is nothing in South Vietnam, nothing which could happen, that realistically threatens the United States of America.
And to attempt to justify the loss of one American life in Vietnam, Cambodia or Laos, but linking such loss to the preservation of freedom which those misfits supposedly abuse, is to us the height of criminal hypocrisy.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
And it's that kind of hypocrisy which we feel has torn this country apart.
USA 2006
Vietnam Veteran expressing grief at the Moving Wall in Salem, Oregon.

This Ex-Marine saw a lot of combat at Khe Sanh in 1968.

Comment and photo: Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Vietnam Veteran expressing grief at the Moving Wall in Salem, Oregon.
This Ex-Marine saw a lot of combat at Khe Sanh in 1968.
Comment and photo:
Mike Hastie Vietnam Veteran
We are probably much more angry than that, and I don't want to go into the foreign policy aspects because I am outclassed here.
I know that all of you have talked about every possible — every possible alternative to getting out of Vietnam.
We understand that.
We know that you've considered the seriousness of the aspects to the utmost level and I'm not going to try and deal on that.
But I want to relate to you the feeling which many of the men who have returned to this country express.
Because we are probably angriest about all that we were told about Vietnam and about the mystical war against communism.
We found that not only was it a civil war, an effort by a people who had for years been seeking their liberation from any colonial influence whatsoever, but also we found that the Vietnamese, whom we had enthusiastically molded after our own image, were hard put to take up the fight against the threat we were supposedly saving them from.
We found that most people didn't even know the difference between communism and democracy.
They only wanted to work in rice paddies without helicopters strafing them and bombs with napalm, burning their villages and tearing their country apart.
They wanted everything to do with the war — particularly with this foreign presence of the United States of America — to leave them alone in peace.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
And they practiced the art of survival by siding with whichever military force was present at a particular time, be it Viet Cong, North Vietnamese, or American.
We found also that all too often, American men were dying in those rice paddies for want of support from their allies.
We saw first hand how monies from American taxes was used for a corrupt dictatorial regime.
We saw that many people in this country had a one-sided idea of who was kept free by our flag, as blacks provided the highest percentage of casualties.
We saw Vietnam ravaged equally by American bombs, as well as by search-and-destroy missions, as well as by Viet Cong terrorism.
Yet we listened while this country tried to blame all of the havoc on the Viet Cong.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
We rationalized destroying villages in order to save them.
We saw America lose her sense of morality as she accepted very coolly a My Lai and refused to give up the image of American soldiers that hand out chocolate bars and chewing gum.
We learned the meaning of free-fire zones.
Shoot anything that moves.
And we watched while America placed a cheapness on the lives of Orientals.
We watched the United States falsification of body counts.
In fact, the glorification of body counts.
We listened while month after month we were told the back of the enemy was about to break.
We fought using weapons against ‘oriental human beings’ with quotation marks around that.
We fought using weapons against those people which I do not believe this country would dream of using were we fighting in a European theater or let us say a non-third-world-people theater.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War
And so, we watched while men charged up hills because a general said that hill has to be taken, and after losing one platoon or two platoons, they marched away to leave the hill for the reoccupation of the North Vietnamese.
Because — because we watched pride allow the most unimportant of battles to be blown into extravaganzas because we couldn't lose and we couldn't retreat and because it didn't matter how many American bodies were lost to prove that point.
And so there were “Hamburger Hills” and “Khe Sanhs” and “Hill 881's” and “Fire Base 6s” and so many others.
And now we are told that the men who fought there must watch quietly while American lives are lost so that we can exercise the incredible arrogance of Vietnamizing the Vietnamese.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
Each day to facilitate the process by which the United States washes her hands of Vietnam, someone has to give up his life so that the United States doesn't have to admit something that the entire world already knows.
So that we can't say that we have made a mistake.
Someone has to die so that President Nixon won't be, and these are his words, “the first President to lose a war.”
We are asking Americans to think about that.
Because how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in Vietnam?
How do you ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake?
But we are trying to do that.
And we are doing it with thousands of rationalizations and if you read carefully the President's last speech to the people of this country, you can see that he says and says clearly that:
“The issue, gentlemen, the issue is communism.”
And the question is whether or not we will leave that country to the communists or whether or not we will try to give it hope to be a free people.
But the point is, they aren't a free people now under us.
They are not a free people.
And we cannot fight communism all over the world and I think we should have learned that lesson by now.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
But the problem of veterans goes beyond this personal problem.
Because you think about a poster in this country with a picture of Uncle Sam and the picture says “I Want You.”
And a young man comes out of high school and says “That's fine. I'm going to serve my country.”
And he goes to Vietnam and he shoots and he kills and he does his job, or maybe he doesn't kill.
Maybe he just goes and he comes back.
And when he gets become to this country, he finds that he isn't really wanted.
Because the largest unemployment figure here in the country, it varies depending on who you get it from, the Veterans' Administration 15%, various other sources 22%, but the largest figure of unemployed in this country are veterans of this war.
And of those veterans, 33% of the unemployed are black.
That means one out of every 10 of the nation's unemployed is a veteran of Vietnam.
The hospitals across the country won't or can't meet their demands.
It's not a question of not trying.
They haven't got the appropriations.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War:
A man recently died after he had a tracheotomy in California.
Not because of the operation but there weren't enough personnel to clean the mucous out of his tube and he suffocated to death.
Statue of three soldiers, with a Vietnam Veterans Memorial in the background.

Photo taken 1986: Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Statue of three soldiers, with a Vietnam Veterans Memorial in the background.
Photo taken 1986
Mike Hastie Vietnam Veteran
Another young man just died in a New York V.A. Hospital the other day.
A friend of mine was lying in a bed two beds away and tried to help him.
But he couldn't.
They rang a bell and there was no one there to service that man.
And so he died of convulsions.
57%, I understand, 57% of all those entering V.A. Hospitals talk about suicide.
Some 27% have tried.
They try because they come back to this country and they have to face what they did in Vietnam and then they come back and find the indifference of a country that doesn't really care.
Suddenly we are faced with a very sickening situation in this country because there's no moral indignation.
And if there is, it comes from people who are almost exhausted by their past indignancies and I know that many of them are sitting in front of me.
The country has seemed to have lain down and accepted something as serious as Laos just as we calmly shrugged off the loss of 700,000 lives in Pakistan, the so-called greatest disaster of all times.
We are here as veterans to say that we think we are in the midst of the greatest disaster of all times now.
Because they are still dying over there.
And not just Americans, Vietnamese.
And we are rationalizing leaving that country so that those people can go on killing each other for years to come.
Americans seem to have accepted the idea that the war is winding down, at least for Americans.
And they have also allowed the bodies which were once used by a President for statistics to prove that we were winning this war to be used as evidence against a man who followed orders and who interpreted those orders no differently than hundreds of other men in South Vietnam.
We veterans can only look with amazement on the fact that this country has not been able to see that there's absolutely no difference between a ground troop and a helicopter crew.
And yet, people have accepted a differentiation fed them by the administration.
No ground troops are in Laos, so it's alright to kill Laotians by remote control.
But believe me, the helicopter crews fill the same body bags and they wreak the same kind of damage on the Vietnamese and Laotian country side as anyone else.
The President is talking about allowing that to go on for many years to come.
And one can only ask if we will really be satisfied when the troops march into Hanoi.
South Korean riot police block anti-war protesters marching toward the Presidential Blue House in Seoul July 15, 2004.
We are asking here in Washington for some action.
Action from Congress of the United States of America which has the power to raise and maintain armies and which by the Constitution also has the power to declare war.
We have come here, not to the President because we believe that this body can be responsive to the will of the people, and we believe that the will of the people says that we should be out of Vietnam now.
We are here in Washington also to say that the problem of this war is not just a question of war and diplomacy, it's part and parcel of everything that we are trying as human beings to communicate to people in this country.
The question of racism which is rampant in the military.
And so many other questions also.
The use of weapons, the hypocrisy in our taking umbrage in the Geneva Conventions and using that as justification for continuation of this war when we are more guilty than any other body of violations of those Geneva Conventions.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War
In the use of free-fire zones, harassment interdiction fire, search-and-destroy missions, the bombings, the torture of prisoners, the killing of prisoners, accepted policy by many units in South Vietnam.
That's what we are trying to say.
It’s part and parcel of everything.
An American Indian friend of mine who lives on the Indian nation of Alcatraz put it to me very succinctly.
He told me how as a boy on the Indian reservation he watched television and he used to cheer the cowboys when they came in and shot the Indians.
And then suddenly, one day, he stopped in Vietnam and he said my God, I'm doing to these people the very same thing that was done to my people.
And he stopped.
And that's what we are trying to say.
That we think this thing has to end.
We are also here to ask — we are here to ask, and we are here to ask vehemently:  Where are the leaders of our country?
Where is the leadership?
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War
We are here to ask:  Where are McNamara, Bundy, Kilpatrick and so many others?
Where are they now that we, the men whom they sent off to war, have returned?
These are commanders who have deserted their troops, and there is no more serious crime in the law of war.
The Army says they never leave their wounded.
The Marines say they never leave even their dead.
These men have left all the casualties and retreated behind a pious shield of public rectitude.
They have left the real stuff of their reputations bleaching behind them in the sun in this country.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War
Finally, this administration has done us the ultimate dishonor.
They have attempted to disown us and the sacrifices we made for this country.
In their blindness and fear, they have tried to deny that we are veterans or that we served in ‘Nam.’
We do not need their testimony.
Our own scars and stumps of limbs are witness enough for others and for ourselves, we wish that a merciful God could wipe away our own memories of that service.
As easily as this administration has wiped their memories of us.
But all that they have done and all that they can do by this denial is to make more clear than ever our own determination to undertake one last mission.
To search out and destroy the last vestige of this barbaric war.
To pacify our own hearts, to conquer the hate and fear that have driven this country the last 10 years and more.
John Kerry 1971 Speech Against the Vietnam War
And so when 30 years from now our brothers go down the street without a leg, without an arm, or a face, and small boys ask why?
We will be able to say “Vietnam.”
And not mean a desert, not a filthy, obscene memory, but mean, instead, the place where America finally turned, and where soldiers like us helped it in the turning.
Thank you.
August 8, 2007
No Wonder He Didn't Condemn Torture During His 2004 Campaign
Why Did Senator John Kerry Stand Idly By?
By PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS
N aïve Americans who think they live in a free society should watch the video filmed by students at a John Kerry speech September 17, Constitution Day, at the University of Florida in Gainesville.
At the conclusion of Kerry's speech, Andrew Meyer, a 21-year old journalism student was selected by Senator Kerry to ask a question.
Meyer held up a copy of BBC investigative reporter Greg Palast's book, Armed Madhouse, and asked if Kerry was aware that Palast's investigations determined that Kerry had actually won the election.
Why, Meyer asked, had Kerry conceded the election so quickly when there were so many obvious examples of vote fraud?
Why, Meyer, went on to ask, was Kerry refusing to consider Bush's impeachment when Bush was about to initiate another act of military aggression, this time against Iran?
At this point the public's protectors-the police-decided that Meyer had said too much.
They grabbed Meyer and began dragging him off.
Meyer said repeatedly, "I have done nothing wrong," which under our laws he had not.
He threatened no one and assaulted no one.
But the police decided that Meyer, an American citizen, had no right to free speech and no constitutional protection.
They threw him to the floor and tasered him right in front of Senator Kerry and the large student audience, who captured on video the unquestionable act of police brutality.
Meyer was carted off and jailed on a phony charge of "disrupting a public event."
Why did Kerry just stand there while the student was being tortured ?
The question we should all ask is why did a United States Senator just stand there while Gestapo goons violated the constitutional rights of a student participating in a public event, brutalized him in full view of everyone, and then took him off to jail on phony charges?
Kerry's meekness not only in the face of electoral fraud, not only in the face of Bush's wars that are crimes under the Nuremberg standard, but also in the face of police goons trampling the constitutional rights of American citizens makes it completely clear that he was not fit to be president, and he is not fit to be a US senator.
Usually when police violate constitutional rights and commit acts of police brutality they do it when they believe no one is watching, not in front of a large audience.
Clearly, the police have become more audacious in their abuse of rights and citizens.
What explains the new fearlessness of police to violate rights and brutalize citizens without cause?
The answer is that police, most of whom have authoritarian personalities, have seen that constitutional rights are no longer protected.
President Bush does not protect our constitutional rights.
Neither does Vice President Cheney, nor the Attorney General, nor the US Congress.
Just as Kerry allowed Meyer's rights to be tasered out of him, Congress has enabled Bush to strip people, including American citizens, of constitutional protection and incarcerate them without presenting evidence.
How long before Kerry himself or some other senator will be dragged from his podium and tasered?
How long before Kerry himself or some other senator will be dragged from his podium and tasered?
The Bush Republicans with complicit Democrats have essentially brought government accountability to an end in the US.
The US government has 80,000 people, including ordinary American citizens, on its "no-fly list."
No one knows why they are on the list, and no one on the list can find out how to get off it.
An unaccountable act by the Bush administration put them there.
Airport Security harasses and abuses people who do not fit any known definition of terrorist.
Nalini Ghuman, a British-born citizen and music professor at Mills College in California was met on her return from a trip to England by armed guards at the airplane door and escorted away.
A Gestapo goon squad tore up her US visa, defaced her British passport, body searched her, and told her she could leave immediately for England or be sent to a detention center.
Professor Ghuman, an Oxford University graduate with a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, says she feels like the character in Kafka's book, The Trial.
"I don't know why it's happened, what I'm accused of. There's no opportunity to defend myself. One is just completely powerless."
Over one year later there is still no answer.
The Bush Republicans and their Democratic toadies have, in the name of "security," made all of us powerless.
While Senator John Kerry and his Democratic colleagues stand silently, the Bush administration has stolen our country from us and turned us into subjects.
*The video of Andrew's Mayer's arrest may be found at
http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?filmID=601
Paul Craig Roberts was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in the Reagan administration.
He was Associate Editor of the Wall Street Journal editorial page and Contributing Editor of National Review.
He is coauthor of The Tyranny of Good Intentions
Published on Thursday, November 2, 2006 by truthdig
Turning the Corner Into Madness
by Robert Scheer
Combat medics
Vietnam 1970
Every time I hear President Bush railing against those who would “cut and run” in Iraq instead of pursuing “victory,” as he does almost daily, I think back to similar claims being made for the Vietnam debacle when I reported from Saigon in the mid-’60s.
Back then, the U.S. troop presence was lower and casualties fewer than now in Iraq, but the carnage, on all sides, would escalate for the next decade, as we waited miserably for the corner to be turned.
Then, as now, calls for setting a timetable for an orderly withdrawal were rejected as emboldening our enemy to attack America.
Instead of a dignified withdrawal, we plunged ever deeper into the quagmire, leaving 59,000 U.S. troops and 3.4 million Indochinese dead as tribute to our stupidity.
Finally, there was nothing to do but “cut and run” in the most ignominious fashion.
With our U.S. personnel being lifted by helicopter from roofs near our embassy, it seemed like a low point for U.S. influence, and there were dire predictions of communism’s global dominance — just as there is today for the “Islamo-fascist” bogeyman the president has seized upon.
Those predictions, however, proved dead wrong.
Communism did not advance as a worldwide force after our defeat in Vietnam.
On the contrary, a victorious communist-run Vietnam soon went to war with the China-backed communists of Cambodia—overthrowing Pol Pot’s evil Khmer Rouge—and with communist China itself, in a bloody border war.
After all, we know from the various insider memoirs that Bush was unaware that Islam is roughly divided into two rival sects, Sunni and Shiite, while just last week he bizarrely announced that our Iraq policy had never been “stay the course” — as if he was unaware of the invention of video-recording equipment that had captured him saying just that countless times.
Today communist Vietnam is still battling communist China—but now it is for shelf space in Wal-Mart and Costco.
US now dependent upon China
The United States, meanwhile, spending itself silly under the haplessly irresponsible President Bush, is now dependent on China both to carry its debt and contain communist North Korea’s nuclear threat.
So why accept the president’s shrill insistence that a U.S. withdrawal from Iraq would be a disaster?
Surely our departure would compel Iraq’s neighbors in Iran, Syria and Jordan to get serious about quelling the civil war that they have abetted and which, in the absence of the U.S. occupation, would threaten to breach Iraq’s borders.
Iraqis best qualified to make their own history
Why not assume, as turned out to be the case with Vietnam, that the Iraqis are best qualified to make their own history?
The astounding arrogance that underwrites Bush’s smug determination to keep killing and maiming tens, perhaps hundreds, of thousands of people is no different than that of Presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.
Both knew the war was a failure but determined to “stay the course” for a decade out of a misguided belief in protecting an image of American infallibility that was paired with shameful political motives.
Now, as in Vietnam, our arrogance has created disaster in Iraq.
Our soldiers continue to kill and die, at enormous cost to the U.S. taxpayers and in international influence and moral standing, but the cause is already lost, doomed by the ignorance, lies and bad faith that launched it.
An Iraqi man stands near an unexploded cluster bomb in Najaf, in 2003.

Civilians make up 98 percent of the tens of thousands of victims of cluster bombs in the 30 years since their introduction during the Vietnam war.

AFP/Karim Sahib
An Iraqi man stands near an unexploded cluster bomb in Najaf, in 2003.
Civilians make up 98 percent of the tens of thousands of victims of cluster bombs in the 30 years since their introduction during the Vietnam war.
Fierce nationalism since long before the United States existed as a nation
Astonishingly, considering our history and the stakes, our leaders show not the slightest interest in understanding the fierce nationalism and deep religious divisions that have marked the Mideast since long before the United States existed as a nation.
And thus we have repeated the decisive folly of Vietnam, where our “experts” ignored a thousand-year history of Chinese occupation in assuming that the fierce nationalist Ho Chi Minh was a puppet of masters in Red Beijing.
This time, we are led by a false warrior who insists on playing the simpleton, ignoring his prestigious education at Andover and Yale in favor of what he presumes are the prejudices of Middle America.
Or is this giving Bush, the son of a president, too much credit?
After all, we know from the various insider memoirs that Bush was unaware that Islam is roughly divided into two rival sects, Sunni and Shiite, while just last week he bizarrely announced that our Iraq policy had never been “stay the course” — as if he was unaware of the invention of video-recording equipment that had captured him saying just that countless times.
Whatever you call it, his approach is a sham and a disaster.
It is long past time to let pragmatic realpolitik find a patchwork solution that the region and Iraqis can accept, peacefully.
That is the expected advice from Bush family consigliere and troubleshooter James Baker and his Iraq Study Group, which is to report soon after the election.
Truly frightening on this Day of the Dead, though, is that Bush probably won’t listen to reason, unless the voters first soundly repudiate him in next week’s election.



Common Dreams © 1997-2006
 
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq — Most Recent
Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the US 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.   Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013
Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.   More than 6,500 veteran suicides are logged every year — more than the total number of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since those wars began.
Mary Coghill Kirkland said she asked her son, 21-year-old Army Spc. Derrick Kirkland, what was wrong as soon as he came back from his first deployment to Iraq in 2008.   He had a ready answer: "Mom, I'm a murderer."
A military base on the brink
As police agents watched he shot himself in the head
Murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug overdoses
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq II
U.S. Soldier Killed Herself After Objecting to Interrogation Techniques
Private Gary Boswell, 20, from Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, was found hanging in a playground in July
She is Jeanne "Linda" Michel, a Navy medic.   She came home last month to her husband and three kids ages 11, 5, and 4, delighted to be back in her suburban home of Clifton Park in upstate New York.   Two weeks after she got home, she shot and killed herself.
Peterson refused to participate in the torture after only two nights working in the unit known as the cage
     United States Numb to Iraq Troop Deaths       
     All papers relating to the interrogations have been destroyed     
      We stripped them and were supposed to mock them and degrade their manhood     
Alex Jones End Game.

Photo: prisonplanet.tv
Alex Jones End Game.

Photo: prisonplanet.tv
Alex Jones End Game.

Photo: prisonplanet.tv
Alex Jones End Game.

Photo: prisonplanet.tv
Click on image to help Alex and for high quality video
EndGame — Alex Jones, you have done the world a great favor
It has taken me until now to view this great masterpiece that chronicles the planet's true history
But I am glad for this delay as my awareness of reality, and the events that seemingly must unfold to educate humankind, have come from sentience off planet — now with this movie the circles merge
A movie par excellence, it will likely be considered the most significant in the downfall of the rich and powerful who control the world and rising politicians already in their pocket — the imprisonment of all those who seek to bring forth this horror, this enslavement of 'New World Order'
Kewe
Alex Jones End Game.

Photo: prisonplanet.tv
Published on Monday, July 4, 2005 by CommonDreams.org
by Sheldon Drobny
Justice O'Connor's decision in Bush v. Gore led to the current Bush administration's execution of war crimes and atrocities in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places in the Middle East that are as egregious as those committed by the Third Reich and other evil governments in human history.
US destroyed Fallujah as it tries to destroy the rest of Iraq
The lesson is clear.
Those people who may be honorable and distinguished in their chosen profession should always make decisions based upon good rather than evil no matter where their nominal allegiances may rest.
Justice O'Connor was quoted to have said something to the affect that she abhorred the thought of Bush losing the 2000 election to Gore.
She was known to have wanted to retire after the 2000 election for same reason she is now retiring.
She wanted to spend more time with her sick husband.
Unfortunately, she tarnished her distinguished career with the deciding vote in Bush v. Gore by going along with the partisan majority of the Court to interfere with a democratic election that she and the majority feared would be lost in an honest recount.
She dishonored herself and the Supreme Court by succumbing to party allegiances and not The Constitution to which she swore to uphold.
And the constitutional argument she and the majority used to justify their decision was the Equal Protection Clause.
The Equal Protection Clause was the ultimate basis for the decision, but the majority essentially admitted (what was obvious in any event) that it was not basing its conclusion on any general view of what equal protection requires.
The decision in Bush v Gore was not dictated by the law in any sense—either the law found through research, or the law as reflected in the kind of intuitive sense that comes from immersion in the legal culture.
The Equal Protection clause is generally used in matters concerning civil rights.
The majority ignored their basic conservative views supporting federalism and states' rights in order to justify their decision.
History will haunt these justices down for their utter lack of justice and the hypocrisy associated with this decision.
Sheldon Drobny is Co-founder of Air America Radio.
Unspeakable grief and horror
                        ...and the circus of deception continues...
Most recent 'Circus'    click here
— 2014
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— 2006
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— 2004
— 2003
Circus of Torture   2003 — now
He says, "You are quite mad, Kewe"
And of course I am.
Why, I don't believe any of it — not the bloody body, not the bloody mind, not even the bloody Universe, or is it bloody multiverse.
"It's all illusion," I say.   "Don't you know, my lad, my lassie.   The game!   The game, me girl, me boy!   Takes on interest, don't you know.   T'is me sport, till doest find a better!"
Pssssst — but all this stuff is happening down here
Let's change it!
To say hello:     hello[the at marker]Kewe.info
For Kewe's spiritual and metaphysical pages — click here
Mother her two babies killed by US
More than Fifteen million
US dollars given by US taxpayers to Israel each day for their military use
4 billion US dollars per year
Nanci Pelosi — U.S. House Democratic leader — Congresswoman California, 8th District
Speaking at the AIPAC agenda   May 26, 2005
There are those who contend that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is all about Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.   This is absolute nonsense.
In truth, the history of the conflict is not over occupation, and never has been:  it is over the fundamental right of Israel to exist.
The greatest threat to Israel's right to exist, with the prospect of devastating violence, now comes from Iran.
For too long, leaders of both political parties in the United States have not done nearly enough to confront the Russians and the Chinese, who have supplied Iran as it has plowed ahead with its nuclear and missile technology....
In the words of Isaiah, we will make ourselves to Israel 'as hiding places from the winds and shelters from the tempests; as rivers of water in dry places; as shadows of a great rock in a weary land.'
Pelosi
     Legendary Historian, Attorney & Peace Activist Staughton Lynd     

       on War Resisters, the Peace and Prison Movement 

       Applied for conscientious objector status in 1952   

           Watch listen www.democracynow.org   
  Afghanistan — Western Terror States: Canada, US, UK, France, Germany, Italy      
       Photos of Afghanistan people being killed and injured by NATO      
      
      Chechnya, North Ossetia, Ingushetia, Palestine, Iraq — War and Death — September 2004 photos      
       Dimona Reactor threat      
       Iran tests missile — Israel postures      
Najaf, Basra, Sadr City — War and Death in Iraq — August 2004 photos.
       Cowardly attacks by air killing men women and children in their homes, often never seeing those they kill as the drones or aircraft fly back to the cowardly bases      
           If they kill only the husband, see how they care for the family they have destroyed   
  Afghanistan — Western Terror States: Canada, US, UK, France, Germany, Italy      
       Photos of Afghanistan people being killed and injured by NATO      
World War Two soldiers did not kill Kill ratio Korea, Vietnam.   Iraq.
More atrocities — Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying
The House of Saud and Bush
             December 2004 photos
       All with U.S. Money:       
       US and Israel War Crimes       
             November 2004 photos
al-Sadr City
All with U.S. Money:
Israel agents stole identity of New Zealand cerebral palsy victim.
(IsraelNN.com July 15, 2004) The Foreign Ministry will take steps towards restoring relations with New Zealand.  New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark today announced she was implementing diplomatic sanctions after two Israelis were sentenced on charges of attempting to obtain illegal passports.  Despite Israeli refusal to respond to the accusations, the two are labeled in the New Zealand media as Mossad agents acting on behalf of the Israeli intelligence community.

Foreign Ministry officials stated they will do everything possible to renew diplomatic ties, expressing sorrow over the "unfortunate incident".
Darfur pictures and arial views of destruction — 2003 — 2005
             October 2004 photos
Suicide now top killer of Israeli soldiers
Atrocities files — graphic images
'Suicide bombings,' the angel said, 'and beheadings.'
'And the others that have all the power — they fly missiles in the sky.
They don't even look at the people they kill.'
       The real Ronald Reagan       
       — Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, South Africa        
             Photos September 2004
Follow the torture trail...
             Photos August 2004
Should the dam break, as attempts are being made in Saudi Arabia
             Photos July 2004
US Debt
             Photos June 2004
Lest we forget — Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying
             Photos May 2004
American military: Abu Gharib (Ghraib) prison photos, humiliation and torture
— London Daily Mirror article: non-sexually explicit pictures
             Photos April 2004
The celebration of Jerusalem day, the US missiles that rained onto children in Gaza,
and, a gathering of top articles over the past nine months
             Photos March 2004
The Iraq War — complete listing of articles, includes images
             Photos February 2004
US missiles — US money — and Palestine
             Photos January 2004
Ethnic cleansing in the Beduin desert
             Photos December 2003
Shirin Ebadi Nobel Peace Prize winner 2003
             Photos November 2003
Atrocities — graphic images...
             Photos October 2003
Aljazeerah.info
             Photos September 2003
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