Fallujah: US Marines — Further Allegations of War Crimes Surface


Photos taken by the US military of loved ones in Fallujah when the US attacked the city November, 2004
This image was taken on November 19th, 2004, to identify the dead.
The IRC estimates that at least 60% of the people killed in the assault of Fallujah are women, children and elderly.
Photo: http://dahr.org/
Images inserted by TheWE.cc
US military destroyed 36,000 homes, 9,000 shops, 65 mosques, 60 schools, both train stations, one of the two bridges, two power stations, three water treatment plants and the city’s entire sanitation and telephone systems.
By Felicity Arbuthnot
24 January 2014
As reported June 21, 2014 in Washington Escalates Intervention in Region-Wide Middle East War,
the Pentagon:
“is negotiating rules of engagement that the regime in Baghdad rejected two-and-a-half years ago, before the final pullout of the American military. Key among these provisions, according to Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby, is blanket immunity from Iraqi or international law relating to the slaying of Iraqi civilians or other war crimes.”
As the US-unleashed Grim Reaper continues to cull Iraqis in ever rising numbers, this month of the twenty third anniversary of the 1991 US led onslaught on Iraq and just weeks away from the eleventh woeful wake for the 2003 illegal invasion, yet another atrocity in a litany of those under the illegal US-UK occupation has come to light.
Fallujah, now under attack from US installed tyrant Nuri al Maliki’s sectarian militia armed with US supplied weapons, with the US also:
“ … looking to provide additional shipments of Hellfire missiles to Iraq … as well as ten Scan Eagle drones and forty eight Raven drones”
(Guardian, 7th January 2014) now, another previously unreported US war crime of the myriad heaped on the city in 2004, also returns to haunt them.
The Americans invaded, chillingly:
“house to house, room to room”, raining death and destruction on the proud, ancient “City of Mosques.”
One correspondent wrote:
“There has been nothing like the attack on Fallujah since the Nazi invasion and occupation of much of the European continent — the shelling and bombing of Warsaw in September 1939, the terror bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940.”
Further:
“ …the ‘battle for Fallujah’ was entirely one-sided. US military and technical superiority over the Iraqi resistance (was) as great, if not greater, than the American army’s advantage over their Indian opponents in the 1870s and 1880s.”
Seventy percent of houses and shops were reported destroyed, with those still standing damaged. Iraqi doctor, Ali Fadhil, described a city:
“ … completely devastated, destruction everywhere. It looked like a city of ghosts. Falluja used to be a modern city; now there was nothing. We spent the day going through the rubble that had been the centre of the city; I didn’t see a single building that was functioning.”
(City of Ghosts, The Guardian, January 11, 2005.)
Nicholas J. Davies, author of “Blood on our Hands — the American Invasion and Destruction of Iraq”, has written:
“The Fallujah Compensation Committee reported in March 2005 that the assault destroyed 36,000 homes, 9,000 shops, 65 mosques, 60 schools, both train stations, one of the two bridges, two power stations, three water treatment plants and the city’s entire sanitation and telephone systems.”
A US Marine Sergeant had told Channel 4 News:
“We’ll unleash the dogs of hell, we’ll unleash ‘em… They don’t even know what’s coming — hell is coming! If there are civilians in there, they’re in the wrong place at the wrong time.”
(November 8, 2004) Welcome to liberation, freedom and democracy, US style..
US — UK multiple atrocities
The horrors of 1991, 2003 and the subsequent years will haunt Iraq for decades to come, possibly, as the Mongol invasion, to which it has been compared, for all time, as the US-UK multiple atrocities ring on down the years, with further unearthing of the lies, blood, massacres and bestialities.
Those responsible for the litany of crimes against humanity appear currently on US television and give interviews in publications, talking of their trauma and sacrifice in Fallujah’s near destruction and their wholesale butchery, as the city suffers yet further.
“Most veterans are deeply disappointed that the struggles and the sacrifices they made…have seemingly been for naught.”
Peter Manor, a retired US officer who served in Iraq as a brigade Commander and on the staff of Gen. David Petraeus, is quoted as saying.
“The images of al-Qaida militants surging back into cities that were secured at an enormous sacrifice has chilled Americans who fought in Iraq.”
A typical comment.
Try burying you husband, wife, children in the garden or yard, pinned down by US fire, unable to even transport them to a remaining Mosque, then cemetery, to weep them farewell — or watching them eaten by stray dogs, and under US fire, unable to rescue their remains.
In context, that unnamed US Marine again: “It wasn’t a war, it was a massacre.”
As late as September 2010, American soldiers were still murdering the inhabitants of Fallujah, including an eighty five year old man and seven souls described as “youngsters.”
That same month a Report was presented to the 15th Session of the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva entitled: “Testimonies of Crimes Against Humanity in Tallulah — Towards a Fair International Criminal Trial.”
Pleads and implores the United Nations
The document:
“…pleads and implores”, the United Nations in : “…respect for the memory (of the) victims, to investigate the crimes and violations”, in the document, and all that: “has been inflicted upon Iraq, placing the country at the top of the world’s daily list for deaths, displaced persons, both internally and externally, the ensuing savage corruption, child molestation, rape, rampant kidnapping, contrary to the noble goals and (founding aspirations) of your Organization.”
The subsequent silence has been — predictably — deafening.
The latest crimes in Fallujah emerged this month, when forty one photographs surfaced showing a US Marine pouring what appears to be gasoline over an Iraqi bodies and setting them alight, others are of burned, blackened human remains, of bodies on fire and a Marine crouching next to a skull, pointing his gun at it, for a souvenir photograph.
US Central command has said the photographs, obtained by TMZ, had not been previously brought to their attention. Another day, another plethora of war crimes, it would seem.
“Col. Steve Warren, Director of Press Operations for the Dept. of Defense, tells TMZ … the pictures appear to show U.S. soldiers in violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice … which makes it a crime to mishandle remains.”
Perhaps the Marines are unaware of that. In July 2011, in Afghanistan Marines urinated on dead alleged fighters and posed for photographs with the corpses.
There is no statute of limitations on such and other crimes, thus those responsible can still be prosecuted and jailed, but in the litany of horrors across Iraq, few have answered for their actions.
For complete article notes and links: click here
Copyright © 2005-2014 GlobalResearch.ca
Fallujah victims killed by US soldiers
during the US military attack on the city of Fallujah

Three mass graves with 1,000 corpses found in Iraq
Thursday May 16, 2013
Iraqi officials have found three mass graves containing the bodies of about 1,000 people thought to have been executed by US soldiers during their occupation of the country.
The graves were uncovered in Iraq's western province of al-Anbar.
The remains are believed to be from victims killed by US forces during 2004 and 2005 in the city of Fallujah, located roughly 69 kilometers (43 miles) west of Baghdad.
US Phosphorous bombs over the city of Fallujah 2004

Graves uncovered in Iraq western province of al-Anbar contain the bodies of about 1,000 people thought to have been killed by US soldiers.

Photo: Internet
US Phosphorous bombs over the city of Fallujah 2004

Graves uncovered in Iraq western province of al-Anbar contain the bodies of about 1,000 people thought to have been killed by US soldiers.

Photo: Internet
US Phosphorous bombs over the city of Fallujah 2004
In Amiriyat al-Fallujah
Deputy Chairman of Anbar's provincial council, Sadoun Obaid al-Shaalan, said on Wednesday.
“Security forces and rights groups found the three mass graves in Saqlawiyah and Ameriyah of Fallujah near a cemetery north of the city.
They contain the remains of about a thousand people.”
Lost children
He called on the Iraqi government to order DNA tests on the remains to ascertain the identity of the victims, especially since there are hundreds of families in Anbar — particularly Fallujah — who are trying to discover the fate of their lost children.
The first battle of Fallujah was an unsuccessful attempt by the US military to capture the city in April 2004.
Fighting broke out after four US mercenaries from Blackwater Company were killed, dismembered and hanged from a bridge over the Euphrates River.
On May 1, 2004, the US troops withdrew from Fallujah as Lieutenant General James Conway announced that he had unilaterally decided to turn over operations to the Fallujah Brigade — which composed of local militiamen under the command of former Ba'ath Party General Muhammed Latif.
Iraq accounts of the first battle of Fallujah put the number of injured or dead at more than 400.
The second battle of Fallujah was a joint American and British offensive in November and December 2004.
The Iraq narrative of the second battle puts the total number of dead and wounded at more than 5,000.
MP/SS
© 2013 Press TV.  All rights reserved.
“The soldiers are doing strange things in Fallujah”
“The soldiers are doing strange things in Fallujah,” said one of my contacts in Fallujah who just returned.
He was in his city checking on his home and just returned to Baghdad this evening.
Speaking on condition of anonymity he continued:
“In the center of the Julan Quarter they are removing entire homes which have been bombed, meanwhile most of the homes that were bombed are left as they were.
Why are they doing this?
The American warplanes came continuously through the night and bombed everywhere in Fallujah!
It did not stop even for a moment!
If the American forces did not find a target to bomb, they used sound bombs just to terrorize the people and children.
The city stayed in fear; I cannot give a picture of how panicked everyone was.
In the mornings I found Fallujah empty, as if nobody lives in it.
Even poisonous gases have been used in Fallujah — they used everything — tanks, artillery, infantry, poison gas.
Fallujah has been bombed to the ground.
Nothing is left.”
In Amiriyat al-Fallujah
In Amiriyat al-Fallujah, a small city just outside Fallujah where many doctors from Fallujah have been practicing since they were unable to do so at Fallujah General Hospital, similar stories are being told.
Last month one refugee who had just arrived at the hospital in the small city explained that he’d watched the military bring in water tanker trucks to power blast some of the streets in Fallujah.
Explained Ahmed (name changed for his protection),
“Why are they doing this to beautify Fallujah?
No!
They are covering their tracks from the horrible weapons they used in my city.”
Also last November, another Fallujah refugee from the Julan area, Abu Sabah told me.
“They (US military) used these weird bombs that put up smoke like a mushroom cloud.
Then small pieces feel from the air with long tails of smoke behind them.”
He explained that pieces of these bombs exploded into large fires that burnt peoples skin even when water was dumped on their bodies, which is the effect of phosphorous weapons, as well as napalm.
“People suffered so much from these, both civilians and fighters alike.”
My friend Suthir (name changed to protect identity) was a member of one of the Iraqi Red Crescent relief convoys that was allowed into Fallujah at the end of November.
I’m sure the Americans committed bad things
“I’m sure the Americans committed bad things there, but who can discover and say this,” she said when speaking of what she saw of the devastated city.
They didn’t allow us to go to the Julan area or any of the others where there was heavy fighting, and I’m sure that is where the horrible things took place.”
The Americans didn’t let us in the places where everyone said there was napalm used.
Julan and those places where the heaviest fighting was, nobody is allowed to go there.”
On 30 November the US military prevented an aid convoy from reaching Fallujah.
This aid convoy was sent by the Iraqi Ministry of Health, but was told by soldiers at a checkpoint to return in “8 or 9 days,” reported AP.
Dr. Ibrahim al-Kubaisi who was with the relief team told reporters at that time, “There is a terrible crime going in Fallujah and they do not want anybody to know.”
With the military maintaining strict control over who enters Fallujah, the truth of what weapons were used remains difficult to find.
Meanwhile, people who lived in different districts of Fallujah continue to tell the same stories.
Posted by Dahr_Jamail at January 18, 2005 06:16 PM
This page contains many images that are deeply disturbing to the emotions and for some may make physically sick
New World Order Statistic
In September 2009, Fallujah General Hospital, Iraq, had 170 new born babies, 24% of whom were dead within the first seven days, a staggering 75% of the dead babies were classified as deformed.
This can be compared with data from the month of August in 2002 where there were 530 new born babies of whom six were dead within the first seven days and only one birth defect was reported.
Doctors in Fallujah have specifically pointed out that not only are they witnessing unprecedented numbers of birth defects but what is more alarming is:   "a significant number of babies that do survive begin to develop severe disabilities at a later stage."
Baby Fatima Ahmed was born in Fallujah, Iraq with deformities that include two heads.

In September 2009, Fallujah General Hospital, Iraq, had 170 new born babies, 24% of whom were dead within the first seven days, a staggering 75% of the dead babies were classified as deformed.

This can be compared with data from the month of August in 2002 where there were 530 new born babies of whom six were dead within the first seven days and only one birth defect was reported.

Doctors in Fallujah have specifically pointed out that not only are they witnessing unprecedented numbers of birth defects but what is more alarming is:
Fatima Ahmed was born in Fallujah with deformities that include two heads
Photo: uruknet.info
Deformed babies in Fallujah
click here
The Iraq Invasion's Atrocities, Unearthing the Unthinkable
click here
US psyops — A Long History of America's Dark Side
click here
But this kind of depravity….this is worse than the torture and its affecting far more people.
These are whole platoons, large numbers of U.S. forces either seeing these acts happening, participating in them, not trying to stop them.
There are a lot of people who stormed Fallujah General Hospital.
There are a lot of people in those tanks, roaming around, shooting at the sites, shooting up ambulances.
Psychological problems from those who aren't already psychopaths are going to haunt us, and all of us.
They are certainly going to haunt their families and their communities, their children.
 
 
U.S. War Crimes
On Haditha and Al-Qa’im
an Iraqi doctor sent me this —
“Listen...we witnessed crimes in the west area of the country of what the bastards did in Haditha and Al-Qa’im.
It was a crime, a really big crime we have witnessed and filmed in those places and recently also in Fallujah.
We need big help in the western area of the country.  Our doctors need urgent help there.
Please, this is an URGENT humanitarian request from the hospitals in the west of the country.
We have big proof on how the American troops destroyed one of our hospitals, how they burned the whole store of medication of the west area of Iraq and how they killed a patient in the ward...how they prevented us from helping the people in al-Qa’im.
This is an URGENT Humanitarian request.
The hospitals in the west of Iraq ask for urgent help...we are in a big humanitarian medical disaster...”
Zaneb, a 13-year-old girl both smiling and serious, watches over the younger children who clamor for the foreigners’ attention.
Then the fathers and uncles come to talk, and I cannot keep up with the rapid Arabic full of stories of suffering.
Western Elite Militarism
Western Elite controlled Terror States
We'll replace a state here
Destroy a nation at will
Who cares how many people we kill
Our Iraqi friend translates:  Most people have lost their homes in the bombing.
Some have lost family members and neighbors.
All are angry.
After awhile we walk to another room, down the hall from the one bathroom that is shared by 40 families.  A young man steps forward.
“We did not know the evacuation deadline,” he says.  “I left the city by chance on the day the bombs began, and then I could not get back in.
“My brother, who is mentally handicapped, was left behind.
“When we went back after the attack, he was missing.
“I looked on the list of people killed, I asked at prisons, but there was no answer.
“The Americans told me to ask the Iraqi National Guard, and I did, but they gave me no answer.”
“Please,” he says.  “Tell this tragedy all over the world.  There are whole families who were buried under the rubble.”
USA decimation
Transcript from radio broadcast — Mind Over Matters
December 10, 2004     Interview by Mike McCormick
Humanitarian Law Project petition to the Organization of American States regarding U.S. war crimes against healthcare workers and facilities in Fallujah.
Mike McCormick:    If you would begin by introducing yourself and your organization.
Attorney Karen Parker:    I am Karen Parker. I have a specialized law degree in human rights and armed conflict law.  My organizations are Humanitarian Law Project which is based in Los Angeles.
It has credentials at the United Nations.  The other organization is Association of Humanitarian Lawyers, which I founded with several friends years ago specifically to work on disability rights and war wounded.
Mike McCormick:    Tell me about the petition.
Attorney Karen Parker:    When I saw the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle with a photographs of patients and doctors in a hospital faced down with their hands tied behind their back, and American soldiers with guns on them — most people looking at that photograph would think that's awful but they wouldn't realize that's a war crime.
Under armed conflict law, hospitals, hospital personnel, patients, movable medical units such as ambulances etc are absolutely off limits.
When I read the article the excuse given by the United States, or at least an explanation given by the United States, was that they considered it a field hospital of the insurgents.
Well, it's still off limits, even if it a field hospital of insurgents.
So, there is no excuse for it.
I had prepared a similar petition against the United States for attacking a hospital for mentally retarded and mentally ill in Grenada, and I had filed that petition in the very same place, the Organization of American States, inter-American Commission on Human Rights, so I thought well, this is the only place we can go, and we might as well take this there because it is essentially the same cause of action, and it is an emergency, it is an urgent situation with medical care to civilians and combatants in complete disarray.
So I prepared the petition and submitted it.
Monday, 18 October, 2004
Inside besieged Falluja
Residents of the rebel-held city of Falluja in Iraq are packing their bags and leaving town after one of the heaviest US bombardments for weeks.
BBC News Online spoke by phone to a reporter in the city, contacted by the BBC's Arabic Service, who gave the following account of life there.

The mood in the city is grim.
It is the start of Ramadan, but there is nowhere to celebrate and no food to celebrate with.
Falluja residents inspect the rubble left by a US air strike
Right now faith is a stronger bond than family
Falluja's most popular kebab restaurant used to be the place to go at the end of the day to break the Ramadan fast — but that was bombed by the Americans this week.
Many families have used a lull in the bombing to leave the city.
Fighters are engaged in skirmishes with US forces in the eastern and southern areas. US positions are about half a kilometre from Falluja.
No single militia force controls the whole city.
Different clans in the city have their own militias but they all seem to be working together to fend off US forces.
The people of Falluja are very clannish — but they have also always been very religious and right now faith is a stronger bond than family.
Police and militias
Two elements have been running the affairs of the city — the police force and local militias.
Relations between the two are good — I have seen policemen on the streets chatting to the fighters.
In fact, relations between local fighters and police have always been good — a deal struck some months ago means the police are welcome in the city provided they do not take orders from the Americans.
There are more police on the streets than usual — possibly to protect the property of residents who are leaving the city.
But the risk of looting is small — the local militias have a reputation for being very tough with the criminals.
No foreign fighters
I am not aware of any foreign fighters in Falluja.
If there are any foreigners here, they have blended in very well with the locals.
Foreigners used to frequent the city in the past, but many of them were forced to leave under a deal the city's leaders struck with the government.
Ninety-nine percent of the fighters here are Fallujans.
Local clan leaders are broadly opposed to any kind of foreign presence in the city because they fear they may be spies.
Supplies exhausted
Hospitals have all but run out of supplies and most people know this.
Bloodied hospital floor in Falluja
Hospital workers clean the floor after receiving fresh casualties
But still the injured are being taken there — just so that they can be near the doctors and receive some comfort.
The Iraqi health ministry has not sent any extra supplies.
Food supplies are also running out. All shops are shut.
Some people who fled the city a few days ago have begun returning because they ran out of food.
They are coming back even as more and more people are trying to leave.
'Not a sectarian issue'
The ordinary people of Falluja still want a peaceful solution — but they knew war was inevitable when Prime Minister Iyad Allawi issued his ultimatum earlier this week.
That's when they started stocking up on food.
The people believe they are being targeted because they inflicted heavy casualties on US forces during the siege earlier this year.
Rescue operation at bombed Falluja building
They say the Americans are attacking them because of wounded pride
They say the Americans are attacking them because of wounded pride. They say they are motivated by revenge.
Most people in Falluja believe the Baghdad government is divided into two camps.
They believe the president, Ghazi Yawer, is a Sunni and heads the faction that wants to negotiate a solution to the crisis.
On the other side, they say, is Prime Minister Allawi, a Shia, who believes military force is the only way ahead.
But many people in Falluja, though largely Sunni, dismiss this.
They say Mr Allawi may be a Shia, but this is not why he is at war with Falluja.
They think he simply gives the order to batter Falluja because this is what the Americans want.
Translation from Arabic by Jumbe Omari Jumbe of bbcarabic.com
Dropping Democracy

Cartoon Image: Yousuf Abedlaki, Al-Khaleej, 12/8/04
Dropping Democracy
 
                          To rebel is right, to disobey is a duty, to act is necessary !
twenty
twenty
         one family’s diary of terror           
Wednesday 17th November 2004
Inside Fallujah: one family’s diary of terror
by Dahr Jamail
Last week the US launched a major offensive on Fallujah using heavy artillery, bulldozers and tanks.
The target was insurgents, but here one family reveals the horror of being caught in the conflict
She weeps while telling the story. The abaya (tunic) she wears cannot hide the shaking of her body as waves of grief roll through her.
“I cannot get the image out of my mind of her foetus being blown out of her body.”
Muna Salim’s sister, Artica, was seven months’ pregnant when two rockets from US warplanes struck her home in Fallujah on November 1.
“My sister Selma and I only survived because we were staying at our neighbours’ house that night,” Muna continued, unable to reconcile her survival while eight members of her family perished during the pre-assault bombing of Fallujah that had dragged on for weeks.
Khalid, one of their brothers who was also killed in the attack, has left behind a wife and five young children.
“There were no fighters in our area, so I don’t know why they bombed our home,” said Muna.
“When it began there were full assaults from the air and tanks attacking the city, so we left from the eastern side of Fallujah and came to Baghdad.”
Selma, Muna’s 41-year-old sister, told of horrific scenes in the city which has become the centre of resistance in Iraq over the last few months.
She described houses that had been razed by countless US air strikes, where the stench of decaying bodies swirled around the city on the dry, dusty winds.
“The bombed houses had collapsed and covered the bodies, and nobody could get to them because people were too afraid to drive a bulldozer,” she explained, throwing her hands into the air in despair.
“Even for people to walk out of their houses is impossible in Fallujah because of the snipers.”
Both sisters described a nightmarish existence inside the city where fighters controlled many areas, food and medicine were often in short supply, and the thumping concussions of US bombs had become a daily reality.
Water also was often in short supply, and electricity a rarity.
Like many families cowered down inside Fallujah they ran a small generator when they could afford the fuel.
“Even when the bombs were far away, glasses would fall off our shelves and break,” said Muna.
“None of us could sleep as during the night it was worse.”
While going to the market in the middle of the day to find food, the sisters said they felt terrorised by US warplanes, which often roared over the sprawling city.
“The jets flew over so much,” said Selma, “but we never knew when they would strike the city.”
The women described a scene of closed shops, mostly empty streets, and terrorised residents wandering around the city not knowing what to do.
“Fallujah was like a ghost town most of the time,” described Muna.
“Most families stayed inside their houses all the time, only going out for food when they had to.”
Tanks often attacked the outskirts of the city in skirmishes with resistance fighters, adding to the chaos and unrest.
Attack helicopters rattling low over the desert were especially terrifying, criss-crossing over the city and firing rockets into the centre.
While recounting their family’s traumatic experiences over the last few weeks, from their uncle’s home in Baghdad, each of the sisters often paused, staring at the ground as if lost in the images before adding more detail.
Their 65-year-old mother, Hadima, was killed in the bombing, as was their brother Khalid, who was an Iraqi police captain. Their sister Ka’ahla and her 22-year-old son also died.
“Our situation was like so many in Fallujah,” said Selma, continuing, her voice now almost emotionless and matter of fact. The months of living in terror are etched on her face.
“So many people could not leave because they had nowhere to go, and no money.”
Adhra’a, another of their sisters, and Samr, Artica’s husband, were also among the victims.
Samr had a PhD in religious studies.
Artica and Samr had a four-year-old son, Amorad, who died with his parents and his unborn brother or sister.
The two sisters managed to flee the city from the eastern side, carefully making their way through the US military cordon which, for the most part, encircled the area.
As they left, they witnessed a scene that was full assaults on their city from US warplanes and tanks .
“Why was our family bombed?” pleaded Muna, tears streaming down her cheeks, “There were never any fighters in our area.”
USA decimation
Western Elite Militarism
Western Elite controlled Terror States
We'll replace a state here
Destroy a nation at will
Who cares how many people we kill
How many homes we destroy
How many people we make homeless
"Near the city of Buhrez, 5 kilometers south of Baquba, two Humvess of American soldiers were destroyed recently.
American and Iraqi soldiers came to the city afterwards and cut all the phones, cut the water, cut medicine from arriving in the city and told them that until the people of the city bring the "terrorists" to them, the embargo will continue."
The embargo has been in place for one week now:
"The Americans still won’t anyone or any medicines and supplies into Buhrez, nor will they allow any people in or out. 
Even the Al-Sadr followers who organized some help for the people in the city (water, food, medicine) are not being allowed into the city.
Even journalists cannot enter to publish the news, and the situation there is so bad.
The Americans keep asking for the people in the city to bring them the persons who were in charge of destroying the two Humvees on the other side of the city, but of course the people in the city don’t know who carried out the attack."
      June 2005      
      http://dahrjamailiraq.com/weblog/archives/dispatches/000256.php      
 


Behind the phosphorus clouds are war crimes within war crimes
We now know the US also used thermobaric weapons in its assault on Falluja, where up to 50,000 civilians remained
George Monbiot
Tuesday November 22, 2005
The Guardian
The media couldn't have made a bigger pig's ear of the white phosphorus story.
So, before moving on to the new revelations from Falluja, I would like to try to clear up the old ones.
There is no hard evidence that white phosphorus was used against civilians.
The claim was made in a documentary broadcast on the Italian network RAI, called Falluja: the Hidden Massacre.
It claimed that the corpses in the pictures it ran "showed strange injuries, some burnt to the bone, others with skin hanging from their flesh ... The faces have literally melted away, just like other parts of the body.
The clothes are strangely intact."
These assertions were supported by a human-rights advocate who, it said, possessed "a biology degree".
I, too, possess a biology degree, and I am as well qualified to determine someone's cause of death as I am to perform open-heart surgery.
So I asked Chris Milroy, professor of forensic pathology at the University of Sheffield, to watch the film.
He reported that "nothing indicates to me that the bodies have been burnt".
They had turned black and lost their skin "through decomposition".
We don't yet know how these people died.
It is not a chemical weapon. They are not outlawed or illegal
But there is hard evidence that white phosphorus was deployed as a weapon against combatants in Falluja.
As this column revealed last Tuesday, US infantry officers confessed that they had used it to flush out insurgents.
A Pentagon spokesman told the BBC that white phosphorus "was used as an incendiary weapon against enemy combatants".
He claimed "it is not a chemical weapon. They are not outlawed or illegal."
This denial has been accepted by most of the mainstream media.
UN conventions, the Times said, "ban its use on civilian but not military targets".
But the word "civilian" does not occur in the chemical weapons convention.
The use of the toxic properties of a chemical as a weapon is illegal, whoever the target is.
The Pentagon argues that white phosphorus burns people, rather than poisoning them, and is covered only by the protocol on incendiary weapons, which the US has not signed.
But white phosphorus is both incendiary and toxic.
The gas it produces attacks the mucous membranes, the eyes and the lungs.
As Peter Kaiser of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons told the BBC last week:
"If ... the toxic properties of white phosphorus, the caustic properties, are specifically intended to be used as a weapon, that of course is prohibited, because ... any chemicals used against humans or animals that cause harm or death through the toxic properties of the chemical are considered chemical weapons."
US knows its use is illegal
The US army knows that its use as a weapon is illegal.
In the Battle Book, published by the US Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, my correspondent David Traynier found the following sentence:
"It is against the law of land warfare to employ WP against personnel targets."
Pentagon is no doubt white phosphorus is illegal chemical weapon
Last night the blogger Gabriele Zamparini found a declassified document from the US department of defence, dated April 1991, and titled "Possible use of phosphorus chemical".
"During the brutal crackdown that followed the Kurdish uprising," it alleges:
"Iraqi forces loyal to President Saddam may have possibly used white phosphorus (WP) chemical weapons against Kurdish rebels and the populace in Erbil ... and Dohuk provinces, Iraq.
The WP chemical was delivered by artillery rounds and helicopter gunships ... These reports of possible WP chemical weapon attacks spread quickly ... hundreds of thousands of Kurds fled from these two areas."
The Pentagon is in no doubt, in other words, that white phosphorus is an illegal chemical weapon.
The insurgents [Resistance forces], of course, would be just as dead today if they were killed by other means.
So does it matter if chemical weapons were mixed with other munitions?
It does.
Anyone who has seen those photos of the lines of blind veterans at the remembrance services for the first world war will surely understand the point of international law, and the dangers of undermining it.
War crime within a war crime within a war crime
But we shouldn't forget that the use of chemical weapons was a war crime within a war crime within a war crime.
Both the invasion of Iraq and the assault on Falluja were illegal acts of aggression.
Before attacking the city, the marines stopped men "of fighting age" from leaving.
Many women and children stayed: the Guardian's correspondent estimated that between 30,000 and 50,000 civilians were left.
The marines treated Falluja as if its only inhabitants were fighters.
They levelled thousands of buildings, illegally denied access to the Iraqi Red Crescent and, according to the UN's special rapporteur, used "hunger and deprivation of water as a weapon of war against the civilian population".
The heroics [of marines] will be subject of many articles and books...
I have been reading accounts of the assault published in the Marine Corps Gazette.
The soldiers appear to have believed everything the US government told them.
One article claims that "the absence of civilians meant the marines could employ blast weapons prior to entering houses that had become pillboxes, not homes".
Another said that "there were less than 500 civilians remaining in the city".
It continued:
"The heroics [of the marines] will be the subject of many articles and books ...
The real key to this tactical victory rested in the spirit of the warriors who courageously fought the battle.
They deserve all of the credit for liberating Falluja."
Buried in this hogwash
But buried in this hogwash is a grave revelation.
An assault weapon the marines were using had been armed with warheads containing "about 35% thermobaric novel explosive (NE) and 65% standard high explosive".
They deployed it "to cause the roof to collapse and crush the insurgents fortified inside interior rooms".
It was used repeatedly: "The expenditure of explosives clearing houses was enormous."
The marines can scarcely deny that they know what these weapons do.
An article published in the Gazette in 2000 details the effects of their use by the Russians in Grozny.
Thermobaric, or "fuel-air" weapons, it says, form a cloud of volatile gases or finely powdered explosives.
"This cloud is then ignited and the subsequent fireball sears the surrounding area while consuming the oxygen in this area.
The lack of oxygen creates an enormous overpressure ...
Personnel under the cloud are literally crushed to death.
Outside the cloud area, the blast wave travels at some 3,000 metres per second ...
As a result, a fuel-air explosive can have the effect of a tactical nuclear weapon without residual radiation ...
Those personnel caught directly under the aerosol cloud will die from the flame or overpressure.
Create air embolism within blood vessels, concussions, multiple internal haemorrhages in the liver and spleen, collapsed lungs, rupture of the eardrums and displacement of the eyes from their sockets
For those on the periphery of the strike, the injuries can be severe.
Burns, broken bones, contusions from flying debris and blindness may result.
Further, the crushing injuries from the overpressure can create air embolism within blood vessels, concussions, multiple internal haemorrhages in the liver and spleen, collapsed lungs, rupture of the eardrums and displacement of the eyes from their sockets."
It is hard to see how you could use these weapons in Falluja without killing civilians.
This looks to me like a convincing explanation of the damage done to Falluja, a city in which between 30,000 and 50,000 civilians might have been taking refuge.
It could also explain the civilian casualties shown in the film.
So the question has now widened:
Is there any crime the coalition forces have not committed in Iraq?
Monbiot.com
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2006
Emphasis, subtitles, images inserted by TheWE.cc
 
US Militarism
Falluja 2007
Seven months before the onslaught of killing by US troops in November
US killing and wounding in Fallujah, April 2004
All funded by U.S. taxpayer
US forces 'used chemical weapons' during assault on city of Fallujah
By Peter Popham
Published: 08 November 2005
Powerful new evidence emerged yesterday that the United States dropped massive quantities of white phosphorus on the Iraqi city of Fallujah during the attack on the city in November 2004, killing insurgents and civilians with the appalling burns that are the signature of this weapon.
Ever since the assault, which went unreported by any Western journalists, rumours have swirled that the Americans used chemical weapons on the city.
On 10 November last year, the Islam Online website wrote: "US troops are reportedly using chemical weapons and poisonous gas in its large-scale offensive on the Iraqi resistance bastion of Fallujah, a grim reminder of Saddam Hussein's alleged gassing of the Kurds in 1988."
The website quoted insurgent sources as saying: "The US occupation troops are gassing resistance fighters and confronting them with internationally banned chemical weapons."
In December the US government formally denied the reports, describing them as "widespread myths". "Some news accounts have claimed that US forces have used 'outlawed' phosphorus shells in Fallujah," the USinfo website said. "Phosphorus shells are not outlawed. US forces have used them very sparingly in Fallujah, for illumination purposes.
"They were fired into the air to illuminate enemy positions at night, not at enemy fighters."
But now new information has surfaced, including hideous photographs and videos and interviews with American soldiers who took part in the Fallujah attack, which provides graphic proof that phosphorus shells were widely deployed in the city as a weapon.
In a documentary to be broadcast by RAI, the Italian state broadcaster, this morning, a former American soldier who fought at Fallujah says: "I heard the order to pay attention because they were going to use white phosphorus on Fallujah. In military jargon it's known as Willy Pete.
"Phosphorus burns bodies, in fact it melts the flesh all the way down to the bone ... I saw the burned bodies of women and children. Phosphorus explodes and forms a cloud. Anyone within a radius of 150 metres is done for."
Photographs on the website of RaiTG24, the broadcaster's 24-hours news channel, www.rainews24.it, show exactly what the former soldier means. Provided by the Studies Centre of Human Rights in Fallujah, dozens of high-quality, colour close-ups show bodies of Fallujah residents, some still in their beds, whose clothes remain largely intact but whose skin has been dissolved or caramelised or turned the consistency of leather by the shells.
A biologist in Fallujah, Mohamad Tareq, interviewed for the film, says: "A rain of fire fell on the city, the people struck by this multi-coloured substance started to burn, we found people dead with strange wounds, the bodies burned but the clothes intact."
The documentary, entitled Fallujah: the Hidden Massacre, also provides what it claims is clinching evidence that incendiary bombs known as Mark 77, a new, improved form of napalm, was used in the attack on Fallujah, in breach of the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons of 1980, which only allows its use against military targets.
Meanwhile, five US soldiers from the elite 75th Ranger Regiment have been charged with kicking and punching detainees in Iraq.
The news came as a suicide car bomber killed four American soldiers at a checkpoint south of Baghdad yesterday.
 
Unknown how many people killed in US attack
Estimates upwards of 1600 people in their homes in two week period.
Unknown how many injured
US lied to Britain over use of napalm in Iraq war
By Colin Brown, Deputy Political Editor
17 June 2005
American officials lied to British ministers over the use of "internationally reviled" napalm-type firebombs in Iraq.
Yesterday's disclosure led to calls by MPs for a full statement to the Commons and opened ministers to allegations that they held back the facts until after the general election.
Despite persistent rumours of injuries among Iraqis consistent with the use of incendiary weapons such as napalm, Adam Ingram, the Defence minister, assured Labour MPs in January that US forces had not used a new generation of incendiary weapons, codenamed MK77, in Iraq.
But Mr Ingram admitted to the Labour MP Harry Cohen in a private letter obtained by The Independent that he had inadvertently misled Parliament because he had been misinformed by the US.
"The US confirmed to my officials that they had not used MK77s in Iraq at any time and this was the basis of my response to you," he told Mr Cohen.
"I regret to say that I have since discovered that this is not the case and must now correct the position."
Mr Ingram said 30 MK77 firebombs were used by the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force in the invasion of Iraq between 31 March and 2 April 2003.
They were used against military targets "away from civilian targets", he said.
This avoids breaching the 1980 Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW), which permits their use only against military targets.
Britain, which has no stockpiles of the weapons, ratified the convention, but the US did not.
The confirmation that US officials misled British ministers led to new questions last night about the value of the latest assurances by the US.
Mr Cohen said there were rumours that the firebombs were used in the US assault on the insurgent stronghold in Fallujah last year, claims denied by the US.
He is tabling more questions seeking assurances that the weapons were not used against civilians.
Mr Ingram did not explain why the US officials had misled him, but the US and British governments were accused of a cover-up.
The Iraq Analysis Group, which campaigned against the war, said the US authorities only admitted the use of the weapons after the evidence from reporters had become irrefutable.
Mike Lewis, a spokesman for the group, said:
"The US has used internationally reviled weapons that the UK refuses to use, and has then apparently lied to UK officials, showing how little weight the UK carries in influencing American policy."
He added:
"Evidence that Mr Ingram had given false information to Parliament was publicly available months ago.
He has waited until after the election to admit to it — a clear sign of the Government's embarrassment that they are doing nothing to restrain their own coalition partner in Iraq."
The US State Department website admitted in the run-up to the election that US forces had used MK77s in Iraq.
Protests were made by MPs, but it was only this week that Mr Ingram confirmed the reports were true.
Mike Moore, the Liberal Democrat defence spokes-man, said:
"It is very serious that this type of weapon was used in Iraq, but this shows the US has not been completely open with the UK.
We are supposed to have a special relationship.
It has also taken two months for the minister to clear this up.
This is welcome candour, but it will raise fresh questions about how open the Government wished to be... before the election."
The MK77 bombs, an evolution of the napalm used in Vietnam and Korea, carry kerosene-based jet fuel and polystyrene so that, like napalm, the gel sticks to structures and to its victims.
The bombs lack stabilising fins, making them far from precise.
©2005 Independent Digital (UK) Ltd.  All rights reserved
Photos taken of loved ones killed in Fallujah when the US attacked the city November 2004
60% of people killed in the assault of Fallujah are women, children and elderly
 
"In a letter my mother sent to me over a month ago regarding Ted, it mentioned that he was frustrated with all the distrust, lying and killing by the contractors and also by the Iraqi police amongst each other and in police cases where they were supposed to be protecting people.
He felt it was unsolvable.
He had asked for prayers, saying they were 'really needed now.'
The letter mentions that he was fed up with the Army and was getting out.
I read this and then put more facts together …one bullet, non-combat, closed casket, no info from military to the public and it seems like the worst may have happened."
 
April 15, 2005
Fallujah: Dresden in Iraq
Although studiously ignored by the mainstream news media, last month came reports that the U.S. used napalm and chemical weapons in its assault upon the city of Fallujah.
The assault of November 2004 resulted in the near-total destruction of the city, as well as the deaths of thousands of non-insurgent Iraqi civilians.
If the reports about napalm and chemical weapons are true, not only would the U.S. be in violation of international law, it would be guilty of the very crimes against humanity that it previously leveled against Saddam Hussein and used as a justification for invading Iraq.
Reportedly, Dr. Khalid ash-Shaykhli of the Iraq Ministry of Health held a press conference last month and charged the U.S. with using napalm, mustard gas, and nerve gas when it attacked Fallujah in November 2004.
Dr. ash-Shaykhli described "melted" bodies and fires that could not be put out with water.
Similarly, Dr. ash-Shaykhli described entire sections of the city where nothing, neither cats nor dogs nor birds, was left alive, suggesting the use of chemical weapons.
Promptly, the United States denied Dr. ash-Shaykhli’s allegations about mustard and nerve gasses.
The U.S. even went so far as to deny the very existence of Dr. ash-Shaykhli or that anyone by that name ever worked for Iraq’s Ministry of Health.
According to the U.S., the false story about the U.S. military’s use of chemical and nerve gasses in Fallujah was invented by a web site pretending to be that of the Qatari television network Al Jazeera.
Unfortunately, the U.S. denial of wrongdoing in Fallujah cannot withstand scrutiny.
For example, while the U.S. is correct that a fake Al Jazeera ("aljazeera.com") published a story about U.S. atrocities in Fallujah, the U.S. glosses over the fact that the real Al Jazeera ("aljazeera.net") published a similar story.
On March 17, 2005, the real Al Jazeera reported on the wholesale killings of civilians by U.S. forces in Fallujah, including through the use of napalm.
In that story, the real Al Jazeera provided eyewitness accounts of U.S. forces killing entire families, including women and children.
Likewise, the real Al Jazeera reported that the U.S. raided the only hospital in Fallujah at the beginning of the assault in order to prevent reports of civilian casualties.
The U.S. has yet to attempt to discredit the story published by the real Al Jazeera.
Furthermore, U.S. denials about using prohibited weapons in Fallujah, particularly napalm, lack credibility inasmuch as the U.S. was forced to retract previous denials of similar accusations.
On March 22, 2003, following the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that U.S. forces had used napalm.
Noting that napalm had been banned by a United Nations convention in 1980 (a convention never signed by the U.S.), U.S. military spokesmen denied using napalm in Iraq.
On August 5, 2003, however, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported that U.S. officials confirmed using "napalm-like" weapons in Iraq between March and April 2003.
In a feat of semantic hair-splitting of which Bill Clinton would have been proud, the U.S. claimed the incendiaries used in Iraq contained less benzene than the internationally-banned napalm and, therefore, were "firebombs" and not napalm.
According to U.S. officials, had reporters asked about firebombs in March of 2003, the U.S. would have confirmed their use.
Nonetheless, the U.S. was forced to concede that regardless of the technicalities, the napalm-like weapons were functionally equivalent to napalm.
In fact, the difference between napalm and firebombs is so minute that U.S. forces still refer to the weapons as napalm.
With that kind of track-record, it is difficult to swallow the recent denials by the U.S. that it used napalm or any other banned weapons in Fallujah.
Such denials are even less convincing when contrasted with eye-witness reports of what happened in Fallujah.
There are, first of all, the findings by Dr. Khalid ash-Shaykhil of Iraq’s Ministry of Health that U.S. forces used napalm and chemical weapons in Fallujah.
However, even taking as true the U.S. claim that Dr. ash-Shaykhli never existed, much less worked for Iraq’s Ministry of Health, he is not the only individual to claim that the U.S. used banned weapons in Fallujah.
For instance, on November 10, 2004, the San Francisco Chronicle quoted Kamal Hadeethi, a physician from a hospital near Fallujah, as saying, "The corpses of the mujahedeen which we received were burned, and some corpses were melted."
When he spoke from Baghdad on November 29, 2004 with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now!, American journalist Dahr Jamail recounted stories told to him by refugees from Fallujah.
According to Jamail, the refugees described bombs which covered entire areas with fire that could not be extinguished with water and which burned bodies beyond recognition.
Likewise, in a November 26, 2004 story for the Inter Press Service (http://ipsnews.net/new_nota.asp?idnews=26440 ), Jamail reported eye-witness accounts of U.S. forces using chemical weapons and napalm in Fallujah.
Later, in a January 18, 2005 report for Electronic Iraq, Jamail reported eye-witness accounts of U.S. forces using bulldozers and dump-trucks to remove tons of soil from various sections of Fallujah.
Eye-witnesses also described U.S. forces using water tankers to "power wash" some of the streets in Fallujah.
It does not take a conspiracy-theorist to conclude that U.S. forces wanted to "decontaminate" the city and remove evidence of chemical weapons.
On November 29, 2004, Al Jazeera TV (the real Al Jazeera) interviewed Dr. Ibrahim al-Kubaysi in Baghdad after his medical delegation was denied access to Fallujah.
In that interview, Dr. al-Kubaysi recounted eye-witness descriptions of blackened corpses and corpses without bullet holes strewn throughout the streets of Fallujah.
On February 26, 2005, the German newspaper Junge Welt published an interview with Dr. Mohammad J. Haded, a member of the medical staff of the Central Hospital of Fallujah, and Mohammad F. Awad, a member of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society who helped gather corpses in Fallujah for identification.
In that interview, Dr. Haded described Fallujah as "Dresden in Iraq" and Awad recounted the "remarkable number of dead people [who] were totally charred."
Dr. Haded also described how U.S. forces "wiped out" the hospital in Fallujah, attacked rescue vehicles, and destroyed a makeshift field hospital.
American documentary-maker Mark Manning made similar observations:
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article8353.htm
while in Fallujah, as reported in the March 17, 2005 edition of the Santa Barbara Independent.
Manning visited Fallujah in January 2005 and interviewed Iraqi physicians who told him that the first target of U.S. forces in the November 2004 assault on Fallujah was the hospital and that ambulances were fair-game.
Iraqi physicians told Manning they were certain chemical weapons had been used in Fallujah "because they handled many dead bodies bearing no evident sign of trauma."
As for the use of napalm by U.S. forces, Manning returned home from Fallujah with photographs of charred corpses "whose clothes had been melted into their skin."
Michele Naar-Obed, of the Chicago-based Christian Peacemaker Team, also visited Fallujah in early 2005.
Naar-Obed described her trip in the March 13, 2005 edition of the Duluth News Tribune of Minnesota.
As with Manning, Naar-Obed described Iraqi physicians who were convinced that chemical weapons and napalm were used by U.S. forces in Fallujah.
According to Naar-Obed ( http://www.antiwar.com/blog/index.php?id=P1916 ), U.N. representatives confirmed to her reports of execution-style killings of handcuffed and blindfolded Iraqis, as well as reports of bodies that were burned and horribly disfigured.
Finally, on March 21, 2005, the Commission for the Compensation of Fallujah Citizens, established by the Iraqi transitional government, reported that approximately 100,000 wild and domesticated animals were found dead in Fallujah, killed by chemical or gaseous munitions ( http://www.uruknet.info/?p=m10580 ).
An estimated 600 non-insurgent civilians died in the U.S. assaults upon Fallujah.
Over half of them were women and children.
According to an April 4, 2005 report by IRIN ( http://www.irinnews.org/print.asp?ReportID=46441 ), a U.N. humanitarian information unit, as many as 70 percent of all structures were destroyed or rendered uninhabitable.
There is similarly no water, electricity, or sewage treatment in Fallujah.
Not surprisingly, a mission that was meant to pacify an insurgent stronghold ended up breeding anti-American hatred among Fallujah’s survivors and their sympathizers.
U.S. denials of wrongdoing notwithstanding, there are numerous independent sources making similar reports about U.S. forces employing banned weapons in Fallujah, as well as targeting hospitals and civilians.
In the face of such independent and corroborating reports, it is hard to escape the sickening conclusion that the U.S. violated international law and committed war crimes in its assaults upon Fallujah.
In doing so, the U.S. became the evil the Bush administration has vowed to eradicate.
Suddenly, the Bush administration’s open hostility toward the International Criminal Court in particular, and international law in general, makes a whole lot more sense.
Ken Sanders is a writer based in Tucson, Arizona. Visit his weblog at: www.politicsofdissent.blogspot.com/.
Reported 5th March 2005
U.S. Used Mustard gas, Nerve gas, and Burning Chemicals on Iraqis in Fallujah
U.S. used banned weapons in Fallujah — Health ministry
An official in Iraq’s health ministry said that the U.S. used banned weapons in Fallujah
Dr. Khalid ash-Shaykhli, an official at Iraq’s health ministry, said that the U.S. military used internationally banned weapons during its deadly offensive in the city of Fallujah.
Dr. ash-Shaykhli was assigned by the ministry to assess the health conditions in Fallujah following the November assault there.
He said that researches, prepared by his medical team, prove that U.S. occupation forces used internationally prohibited substances, including mustard gas, nerve gas, and other burning chemicals in their attacks in the war-torn city.
The health official announced his findings at a news conference in the health ministry building in Baghdad.
The press conference was attended by more than 20 Iraqi and foreign media networks, including the Iraqi ash-Sharqiyah TV network, the Iraqi as-Sabah newspaper, the U.S. Washington Post and the Knight-Ridder service.
Dr. ash-Shaykhli started the conference by reporting the current health conditions of the Fallujah residents. He said that the city is still suffering from the effects of chemical substances and other types of weapons that cause serious diseases over the long term.
Asked whether limited nuclear weapons were also used by U.S. forces in Fallujah, Dr. ash-Shaykhli said; “What I saw during our research in Fallujah leads me to me believe everything that has been said about that battle.
“I absolutely do not exclude their use of nuclear and chemical substances, since all forms of nature were wiped out in that city. I can even say that we found dozens, if not hundreds, of stray dogs, cats, and birds that had perished as a result of those gasses.”
Dr. ash-Shaykhli promised to send the findings of the researches to responsible bodies inside Iraq and abroad.
Fallujah residents said napalm gas was used
During the U.S. offensive, Fallujah residents reported that they saw “melted” bodies in the city, which suggests that U.S. forces used napalm gas, a poisonous cocktail of polystyrene and jet fuel that makes the human body melt.
In November, Labour MPs in the UK demanded Prime Minister Tony Blair to confront the Commons over the use of napalm gas in Fallujah.
Furious critics have also demanded that Blair threatens the U.S. to pullout British forces from Iraq unless the U.S. stops using the world’s deadliest weapon.
The United Nations banned the use of the napalm gas against civilians in 1980 after pictures of a naked wounded girl in Vietnam shocked the world.
The United States, which didn’t endorse the convention, is the only nation in the world still using the deadly weapon.
Lies cost lives in Iraq.
Remember the reasons given by the US military and puppet interim Iraqi government for Operation Phantom Fury against Fallujah?
Just prior to the November, 2004 assault on that city, the primary reasons given for the massacre in Fallujah were: to provide “security and stability” for the upcoming January 30 “elections” and to rid Fallujah of Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi.
Let us judge the success or failure of this massacre by their own yardstick.
The “security and stability” generated for the elections on January 30, 2005 by the siege of Fallujah looked like roughly 40 dead Iraqi bodies and 200 wounded, on that day alone.
As for Zarqawi, since not one resident of Fallujah has seen or reported evidence of this individual in their city before, during or after said siege, his existence at all in Iraq remains in question…aside from living large in US military propaganda which is happily trumpeted by corporate media outlets in the US.
Yesterday morning on NPR (National Pentagon Radio) their reporter in Baghdad was asked if he felt what Mr. Bush said in a recent speech was true-was the US military strategy in Iraq working?
He replied that he felt what Mr. Bush said was true in some cases, like in Fallujah.
The NPR reporter referred to Fallujah as “pacified.”
“Pacified” Fallujah looks like a dead six year-old child in that city, shot by a US sniper in the Al-Dubbat neighborhood on December 1st, according to Al-Sharqiyah.
“Pacified” Fallujah looks like:
“Two US soldiers were killed by sniper fire on Wednesday [30 November] in the city of Al-Fallujah, [60 kilometers] west of Baghdad, according to eyewitnesses.
A tense atmosphere prevailed in the city after the US forces besieged some of its quarters and blocked the main street, while National Guard forces closed shops and asked the residents to stay in their homes.”
“Pacified” Fallujah looks like 10 Marines killed and 11 wounded by a roadside bomb while on a “foot patrol near Fallujah” on Thursday December 1st, which was the deadliest attack on American troops in nearly four months.
So if you want to keep thinking there is peace in Fallujah, you’d better ignore the facts on the ground and keep listening to NPR “presstitutes” talking on the radio from their hotel rooms in Baghdad.
Surprised to hear this about NPR?   Don’t be.
According to Robert McChesney, president of Free Press, a national, non-profit, media reform group in the US which works to support a diverse and independent media, our public broadcasting outlets are already infiltrated by Bush Administration ideologues.
“White House loyalists inside the Corporation for Public Broadcasting have launched a crusade to remake PBS, NPR and other public media into official mouthpieces.
Kenneth Tomlinson’s tenure at the CPB was characterized by targeting journalists like Bill Moyers who dared to air dissenting voices or prepare investigative reports on the administration.
Tomlinson’s goal was clearly to fire a shot across the bow of all public stations so managers would shy away from the sort of investigative journalism that might expose Bush administration malfeasance.
Tomlinson resigned in disgrace but left behind a cast of cronies to carry out his partisan crusade.
And we still don’t know the extent to which Karl Rove and others at the White House orchestrated his efforts.”
Free Press also accuses the Bush Administration of bribing journalists, lying about the Iraq War, eliminating dissent in the mainstream media, gutting the Freedom of Information Act, consolidating media control, and manufacturing fake news.
We’ve recently had a nice example of a bright and shining lie with regards to manufacturing fake news in Iraq. A secret military campaign to plant paid propaganda in the Iraqi news media has been uncovered. Exposed is Washington-based Lincoln Group, which has contracts with the military to “provide media and public relations services.”
Meanwhile, failed US propaganda campaigns are not hiding the fact that military planners in Iraq estimate that there are as many as 100 resistance groups now fighting against the Anglo-American occupiers of their country.
Nor have the propagandists managed to hide the fact that two more members of the so-called Coalition of the Willing, Bulgaria and Ukraine, have announced they will begin withdrawing their combined 1,250 troops by the middle of this month.
Most likely, Bulgaria and Ukraine want to get their folks out of Iraq before more of the country becomes “pacified” like Fallujah.
Posted by Dahr_Jamail at December 2, 2005
 
 
Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Photo: http://english.aljazeera.net
Fallujah January 2005
Mike McCormick:    Why is the Organization of American States the only place you can go with this?
Attorney Karen Parker:    The United States has ratified no international human rights agreements that has in it a right for persons who feel they have been violated by the United States to file.
We have signed and ratified a number of human rights agreements, but not those sections or portions of those that allow actions, actual actions for human rights violations.
I call it 'defensive ratification.'
The United States can say — "Oh No.  We are signatory parties, signatory parties"
But any lawyer knows that if your don't have right of action under the treaty you might as well not have it out there.
It is just sweet-smelling words.
However, the Organization of American States has a provision in its charter that requires all member states to accept the jurisdiction of the inter-American Commission on human rights.
You can't opt out.
So, that's the only human rights forum that we can go to.
You can't opt out.
And has that body pursued petitions like yours in the past?
Well my Grenada petition, yes, it accepted it.
Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Picture: http://dahrjamailiraq.com/
Body of loved one in Falluja.
The United States built a 4.2 million state-of-the-art facility to replace the one they bombed.
Okay, so you have had success at this before.
Yes.  The one issue here is that the action did not occur in the territory of a member state of the Organization of American States. Whereas the Grenada petition the victims were in this hemisphere.
So in a sense this is a test case although similar cases brought at the parallel body at the Council of Europe, the European Court of Human Rights, have not found any limitation as to who the victims are, only that you can only petition against a member of the Council of Europe.
In my review of all the language of the OAS Charter, and the American Declaration of Rights and Duties of Man, which is the human rights instrument that we use at the OAS, there is absolutely nothing in there that says petitions can only be brought by residents of member states of the OAS.
It does say that organization petitioners who are filing on behalf of actual victims have to be under the domestic statue of a member state of the OAS, and both HAL and HLP [the petitioners] are United States private non-profits.
Have you yourself had any contact with the victims of which you are representing here?
I have directly and indirectly.  In the Organization of American States proceedings, a non-governmental organization, or an organizational petitioner with a nexus to victims can file without named victims.
That's why the petition was originally named unnamed, unnumbered persons, both living and dead at the facilities.
And our nexus is that we specifically specialize in armed conflict law — that's what humanitarian law is, it is armed conflict law — a bit of a misnomer in a sense although it is called humanitarian law because the very purpose of the Geneva Conventions in the first place was to protect medical facilities in time of war.
alt=
   Daughter in Fallujah.
That was the whole raison d'être.  That was the whole purpose behind setting up the Red Cross system in the first place. Battlefield, medical care — bottom line.
And from that of course a number of other rules have evolved, such as limitation of military operations and weaponry and the like, but the basis for humanitarian law is medical aid for victims or armed conflict on either side.
Like combatant, non-combatant, enemy, non-enemy.
So the Humanitarian Project in association with humanitarian lawyers have a very strong interest — there whole purpose of being — is this area of law.
We are a petitioner particularly unique in that most human rights organizations don't have that focus and may not be viewed as having sufficient nexus.
As we find out actual victims, the actual names of people who were killed or injured, we are adding them as provisional named petitioners pending their approval or notification of next of kin.
It's still in emergency basis because there were seven or eight health personnel that we know by name that were killed in one of the attacks on one of the clinics .
There families are so disbursed, and Fallujah is so in chaos, the likelihood of getting permission from next of kin is very slim, at least until the emergency has long gone.
So, we are convinced that the OAS will allow them as provisional named petitioners.
 
Saturday, 19 November 2005
Hitler's henchmen in the dock
Markus Wolf (archive)
Markus Wolf believes that justice was done in Nuremberg
Markus Wolf, the former head of the East German foreign intelligence service, attended the Nuremberg Trials 60 years ago as a radio journalist.
Now aged 82, he shared his memories of seeing some of Nazi Germany's most notorious war criminals in court — like "staff in a railway station or in a post office" — with the BBC's Berlin correspondent, Tristana Moore:
  The director of news was looking for someone to send to Nuremberg.   I sensed that it was going to be a historic event, so I offered to go and I was sent as a special correspondent.
I was in the seventh row in the Palace of Justice Nuremberg court and there before my eyes were the people who had been found responsible for terrible things.   They were the greatest leaders of the Nazi regime who were still alive, as Hitler was dead, on trial for war crimes.
At the time, when the war ended, most Germans believed that the Nazis would receive severe punishments.
Perhaps I was naïve, but I had seen the photographs of all these Nazi leaders, in all their former pomp and glory.   Then, in Nuremberg, I saw normal, simple people sitting in the dock.   They seemed like staff in a railway station or in a post office.
Not me
I was disappointed.   After being cross-examined by the American Prosecutor, Robert H Jackson, Hermann Goering, like the other Nazi leaders, said he didn't know anything about these huge crimes.
FIRST NUREMBERG TRIAL
Nuremberg trials
Opened 20 November 1945
Hermann Goering, Rudolf Hess and Joachim von Ribbentrop were among the 22 Nazis tried
12 were sentenced to death, others received long prison terms or were acquitted
During the trial, the court was shown terrible documentary films about the concentration camps.   They were videos shot by the Allied troops after the liberation of the camps.
But all along, the defendants maintained that they never knew anything.   Only Hitler, they said, was responsible.   No-one tried to defend the Nazi ideology, to defend the acts committed under the Third Reich.
One after another, the Nazi defendants came into the witness box and they answered questions.
They had lawyers and it was a kind of Anglo-American court.   But the defendants denied any knowledge of these unspeakable crimes.
I learned so much about contemporary German history during the Nuremberg Trials.
They provided an impressive synopsis of the years from 1933 until 1945, shedding light on how the Nazi movement came to power and on Hitler's demagogy.   We must not forget that many Germans supported Hitler, he came to power with the help of German capitalists and business leaders.
When you think of that time, so many people looked away from the crimes that were going on before their own eyes.
In just the same way, as the Nuremberg trials were under way in 1945, many Germans didn't want to hear anything about the concentration camps.   They were behaving the same way as the Nazi defendants sitting in the dock, like Hermann Goering and Albert Speer, who turned their faces to one side when the films about the camps were shown.
Beyond imagining
Sometimes it was difficult to take in what happened, to comprehend the enormity of the crimes.   Some of the films and witnesses who gave evidence in the court — they were former concentration camp prisoners — and the former commander of Auschwitz testified.
He described how thousands of people were killed.   He answered the prosecutors' questions like a good German bureaucrat, or an officer, revealing no emotion.   These were difficult times as I had to absorb this information and describe these traumatic events to my listeners during my radio reports.
In the final report that I filed I said that I hoped that after the Nuremberg Trials, there would be a time without war, aggression or crimes against humanity.   But this hope was an illusion.
Nuremberg set out the rules of international law.   The German people couldn't bring these Nazis to justice.   I had to explain to people that it was the victors' court as the Allies organised the trials.   In the end, three defendants were released.   I was against that, but the fact that there were different sentences proves that justice was done.
I shall never forget that year, November 1945 until October 1946, when the Nazis were sentenced.
It influenced my later life because anti-fascism became the raison d'etre of my life.   After the Nuremberg Trials, in East Germany, I realised that I bore a huge responsibility to protect our country and the rest of the world from a repeat of the horrors of the Nazi regime. 
                          To rebel is right, to disobey is a duty, to act is necessary !
twenty
twenty
         Prevented doctors from reaching emergency              
Monday 3rd January 2005
New horror stories of war crimes at Iraqi hospitals
by Dahr Jamail
Targeting hospitals or ambulances is in direct contravention of the Fourth Geneva Convention, which strictly forbids attacks on emergency vehicles and the impeding of medical operations during war.
"They raided our supply room where our food and supplies are."
"They smashed one of our ambulances,”
“The Americans threatened to do here what they did in Fallujah if I didn’t cooperate with them,”
“They are shooting our ambulances if they try to go to Fallujah.”
“The Americans shot out the lights in the front of our hospital, they prevented doctors from reaching the emergency unit at the hospital, and we quickly began to run out of supplies and much-needed medication,”
“We were tied up and beaten despite being unarmed and having only our medical instruments,”
New horror stories emerge about GI abuses at Iraqi hospitals:
Fallujah hospital

Falluja massacres

US attack on Fallujah, Iraq.

Western Elite controlled Terror States

We'll replace a state here.

Destroy a nation at will.

Who cares how many people we kill.

How many people we will injure.
U.S. marines inspect damage inside a local hospital in the devastated city of Fallujah Dec. 15. Photo: AFP
BAGHDAD (IPS/GIN)-The U.S. military has been preventing delivery of medical care in several instances, medical staff say.
Iraqi doctors at many hospitals have reported raids by coalition forces.
Some of the more recent raids have been in Amiriyat al-Fallujah, about 10km to the east of Fallujah, the town U.S. forces now hold after a bloody assault.
Amiriyat al-Fallujah has been the source of several reported resistance attacks on U.S. forces.
The main hospital in Amiriyat al-Fallujah was raided twice recently by U.S. soldiers and members of the Iraqi National Guard, doctors say.
“The first time was November 29 at 5:40 a.m., and the second time was the following day,” said a doctor at the hospital who did not want to give his real name for fear of U.S. reprisals.
Man wounded in mosque in Falluja, November 13, 2004

abolkhaseb.net
   Man wounded in mosque in Falluja, November 13, 2004
In the first raid, about 150 U.S. soldiers and at least 40 members of the Iraqi National Guard stormed the small hospital, he said.
“They were yelling loudly at everyone, both doctors and patients alike,” the young doctor said.
“They divided into groups and were all over the hospital.
“They broke the gates outside, they broke the doors of the garage, and they raided our supply room where our food and supplies are.
“They broke all the interior doors of the hospital, as well as every exterior door.”
He was then interrogated about resistance fighters, he said.
“The Americans threatened to do here what they did in Fallujah if I didn’t cooperate with them,” he said.
Another doctor, speaking on condition of anonymity, said that all of the doors of the clinics inside the hospital were kicked in.
All of the doctors, along with the security guard, were handcuffed and interrogated for several hours, he said.
The two doctors pointed to an ambulance with a shattered back window.
Smashed one of our ambulances — bullet-riddled ambulance
“When the Americans raided our hospital again last Tuesday at 7 p.m., they smashed one of our ambulances,” the first doctor said.
His colleague pointed to other bullet-riddled ambulances.
Young man killed in the Falluja massacres.

Falluja massacres.

Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

US attack on Fallujah, Iraq.

Western Elite controlled Terror States

We'll replace a state here.

Destroy a nation at will.

Who cares how many people we kill.

How many people we will injure.

abolkhaseb.net
   Young man killed in the Falluja US massacres   
“The Americans have snipers all along the road between here and Fallujah,” he said.
“They are shooting our ambulances if they try to go to Fallujah.”
Blocked any medical supplies from entering
In nearby Saqlawiyah, Dr. Abdulla Aziz told IPS that occupation forces had blocked any medical supplies from entering or leaving the city.
“They won’t let any of our ambulances go to help Fallujah,” he said.
“We are out of supplies and they won’t let anyone bring us more.”
The pattern of military interference in medical work has apparently persisted for many months.
Tank shooting houses with women and children inside.

Falluja massacres

US attack on Fallujah, Iraq.

Western Elite controlled Terror States

We'll replace a state here.

Destroy a nation at will.

Who cares how many people we kill.

How many people we will injure.

abolkhaseb.net
   Tank shooting houses with women and children inside
During the April siege of Fallujah, doctors there reported similar difficulties.
“The Marines have said they didn’t close the hospital, but essentially they did,” said Dr. Abdul Jabbar, orthopedic surgeon at Fallujah General Hospital.
“They closed the bridge which connects us to the city, and closed our road.  The area in front of our hospital was full of their soldiers and vehicles.”
Prevented medical care reaching countless people
This prevented medical care reaching countless patients in desperate need, he said.
“Who knows how many of them died that we could have saved?”
He, too, said the military had fired on civilian ambulances.
They had also fired at the clinic he had been working in since April, he said.
“Some days, we couldn’t leave or even go near the door because of the snipers.  They were shooting at the front door of the clinic.”
U.S. snipers shot and killed ambulance driver
Dr. Jabbar said U.S. snipers shot and killed one of the ambulance drivers of the clinic where he worked during the fighting.
“We were tied up and beaten despite being unarmed and having only our medical instruments,” Asma Khamis al-Muhannadi, a doctor who was present during the U.S. and Iraqi National Guard raid on Fallujah General Hospital, told reporters later.
She said troops dragged patients from their beds and pushed them against the wall.
“I was with a woman in labor, the umbilical cord had not yet been cut,” she said.
Arrested and tied my hands while helping mother to deliver
“At that time, a U.S. soldier shouted at one of the (Iraqi) national guards to arrest me and tie my hands while I was helping the mother to deliver.”
Other doctors spoke of their experience of the raid.
“The Americans shot out the lights in the front of our hospital, they prevented doctors from reaching the emergency unit at the hospital, and we quickly began to run out of supplies and much-needed medication,” said Dr. Ahmed, who gave only a first name.
Two children killed in the Falluja massacres by US forces.

Falluja massacres

US attack on Fallujah, Iraq.

Western Elite controlled Terror States

We'll replace a state here.

Destroy a nation at will.

Who cares how many people we kill.

How many people we will injure.

abolkhaseb.net
   Two children killed in the Falluja massacres by US forces   
U.S. troops prevented doctors from entering the hospital on several occasions, he said.
Targeting hospitals or ambulances is in direct contravention of the Fourth Geneva Convention, which strictly forbids attacks on emergency vehicles and the impeding of medical operations during war.
At several places, doctors said U.S. troops had demanded information from medical staff about resistance fighters. 
“They are always coming here and asking us if we have injured fighters,” a doctor at a hospital said.
A U.S. military spokesman in Baghdad told IPS that routine searches of hospitals are carried out to look for “insurgents.”
He said it has never been the policy of coalition forces to impede medical services in Iraq.
© Copyright 2005 FCN Publishing, FinalCall.com


http://www.finalcall.com/artman/publish/article_1719.shtml
by : Dahr Jamail
Monday 3rd January 2005
Body of loved one in Falluja.

Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Picture: http://dahrjamailiraq.com/
   Body of loved one in Falluja
Interview with Attorney Karen Parker
I am also in contact with a number of people on the ground: medical doctors and lawyers that I know through my long work in the situation in Iraq.
Several of whom are on the ground in various places, and are tracking doctors who know, and trying to get some sense of the numbers.
But at this point I think it is going to be some before we really know the numbers.
We also don't know what the condition is of patients who had been in Fallujah general hospital who were obviously not made any better by what went on.
Tracking down on how this has made them worse — of course now it has made them worse because there is not food or water.
Apparently the Director of Fallujah General Hospital had tried to get some supplies, came back from Baghdad in an ambulance, and that ambulance was shot at and he was wounded.
That was several days ago.
It's chaos.
It doesn't get any worse than this as far as violations go.
Mike McCormick:    Can you summarize how many people you are talking about in this particular incident?
Karen Parker:    If it were in a U.S. court it would be Does, one through 50,000.
I just don't know.
My guess it is somewhere in the range of four to five thousand.
People who were specifically damaged under the provisions of Geneva Convention that protects medical personnel, patients, clinics, the Red Crescent, the Red Cross, ambulances, facilities, storage houses of medical aid etc.
Fallujah 2005.

Bodies being buried.

Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Photo: http://english.aljazeera.net
Bodies being buried
Fallujah child refugees receive lunch donated by local people in Baghdad
Attack on Fallujah by US troops, April 2004
10,000 US troops launched assault on Fallujah, decimating city of more than 300,000, making it unlivable with no water or electricity
 
Former CIA operative US appointed Iyad Allawi, seen here 03 December 2004, arriving in Moscow hoping to soothe tensions over Russia's opposition to the US-led war.

Photo: Occupying forces photo/Reuters, 11/10/04
Former CIA operative US appointed Iyad Allawi, seen here 03 December 2004, arriving in Moscow hoping to soothe tensions over Russia's opposition to the US-led war.
Mike McCormick:    If this petition moves forward, what would be the next steps or phases that you would see happen?
Karen Parker:    One of the next steps is already occurring.
When a petition goes in, normally the Commissioners will send elements of it to the United States Government and ask it to respond.
I think this is already happening because of the exigencies of the situation and because both the International Committee of the Red Cross and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights have spoken out.
That's an alert to the OAS that things are pretty bad.
That pressure coming into the United States from the inter-American system, which would theoretically involve all the states in the western hemisphere that are members and I think that there are very few that aren't.
Several are British Colonies so they are not in, but the Caribbean, Canada, Mexico, Central America and South America. It's a pretty heavy haul when it comes to maintaining diplomatic clout.
And that's one of the reason we have the inter-American Commission on Human Rights so that one state just doesn't turn into a rogue elephant.
          
Falluja women, children in mass grave
Sunday 21 November 2004
 
Many corpses remain unburied, Falluja residents say
Residents of a village neighbouring Falluja have told Aljazeera that they helped bury the bodies of 73 women and children who were burnt to death by a US bombing attack.
"We buried them here, but we could not identify them because they were charred by the use of napalm bombs used by the Americans," said one resident of Saqlawiya in footage aired on Aljazeera on Sunday.
There have been no reports of the US military using napalm in Falluja and no independent verification of the claims.
The resident told Aljazeera all the bodies were buried in a single grave.
Late last week, US troops in Falluja called on some residents who had fled the fighting to return and help bury the dead.
However, according to other residents who managed to flee the fighting after US forces entered the city, hundreds more bodies still lay in the streets and were being fed on by packs of wild dogs.
Danger zone
Meanwhile, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said Falluja remained too dangerous to secure proper retrieval and burial of corpses.
Depleted uranium has caused severe deformities in babies
 
"We could not enter Falluja city so far due to the security measures and the continuing battles," Muain Qasis, ICRC spokesman in Jordan, told Aljazeera.
When asked about the security measures, Qasis said: "In order to carry out an independent and acceptable humanitarian action, we must have guarantees ensuring the safety of the humanitarian staff.
"The humanitarian situation in Falluja city is very difficult.
"The city is still suffering shortage of public services. There is no water or electricity. There is no way to offer medical treatment for the injured families still surrounded inside the city," he added.
Detained civilians released
In related news, the US military in Falluja announced that it had released 400 of the 1450 men it had detained in the war-ravaged city.
"More than 400 detainees have since been released after being deemed non-combatants," the military said, adding that 100 more were due to be released on Sunday.
          Aljazeera + Agencies
A Palestinian Red Crescent worker pauses in agency's pharmacy in Baghdad, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2004. 

US forces raided Palestinian Red Crescent offices Tuesday night and arrested ten people.

Photo: AP/Karim Kadim
A Palestinian Red Crescent worker pauses in agency's pharmacy in Baghdad, Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2004.
US forces raided Palestinian Red Crescent offices Tuesday night and arrested ten people.
Interview with Attorney Karen Parker
The United States is going to have to answer back, particularly because it's an urgent situation.
The Organization of American States will issue privately to the United States measures that they feel must be taken right away.
They are called 'Provisional Measures.'
The United States can't make things worse, has to protect all potential claimants, that kind of thing.
We will not know directly what has been ordered but we may be able to guess based on what happens in the field.
If suddenly the United States sets up a field hospital for the people who were in the clinics that have been destroyed and in the hospitals that have been destroyed or dismantled, that would be evidence that the pressure of the OAS on the United States has born fruit.
Mike McCormick:    And then what would be the ultimate goal?
Karen Parker:    The ultimate goal is for the Organization of American States to find the violations that we say have occurred, and in a sense they already have because they have assigned it a number.
If they didn't think it was a violation they could address, it wouldn't assign a number and we would be told, sorry, this is manifestly ill-founded.
So in a sense we have already found for the law, the next step is finding remedy, to the degree you can get remedy.
A Palestinian Red Crescent worker picks up books and pamphlets in the office in Baghdad.

US forces raided Palestinian Red Crescent offices Tuesday night and arrested ten people.

Photo: AP/Karim Kadim
A Palestinian Red Crescent worker picks up books and pamphlets in the office in Baghdad
il manifesto 23 November 2004
73 charred bodies women and children were found
by GIULIANA SGRENA
We buried them, but we could not identify them because they were charred from the napalm bombs used by the Americans.
People from Saqlawiya village, near Falluja, told al Jazeera television, based in Qatar, that they helped bury 73 bodies of women and children completely charred, all in the same grave.
The sad story of common graves, which started at Saddam’s times, is not yet finished.
Nobody could confirm if napalm bombs have been used in Falluja, but other bodies found last year after the fierce battle at Baghdad airport were also completely charred and some thought of nuclear bombs.
No independent source could verify the facts, since all the news arrived until now are those spread by journalists embedded with the American troops, who would only allow British and American media to enrol with them.
But the villagers who fled in the last few days spoke of many bodies which had not been buried: it was too dangerous to collect the corpses during the battle.
il manifesto
Now a lot of people say but nothing makes up for it.
Well this is true and that is why we have suits that try to make up for it.
That's why personal injury damages now are upwards of two and three million dollars a person.
Nothing makes up for it.
But the way of making it hurt the violator is to pay up.
So we of course want the medical facilities in Fallujah to look gleaming state-of-the-art with everything they could possibly need.
And we want monetary compensation for victims whether living or dead. If dead pay to next of kin.  If living whatever their costs are, plus punitive damages because it's war crimes.
If what the United States has to do, doesn't hurt, then it's like apologizing for a war crime saying, "Oh well, yeah, you know, fix it up a little bit."
We want the remedy to hurt.  Both in terms of the strength of condemnation and in terms of the dollar amount to victims.
American people and our legislators have to know that if we are going to go to war we have to know the rules of war.  If we don't, and we violate the absolute basis of armed conflict law, then we have to learn our lessons.
In addition to the U.S. actions in Fallujah being a violation of the Geneva Convention, are they a violation of any U.S. laws.
They are a violation of all the human rights instruments that the United States has ever ratified:  Arbitrary loss of life, violation of the right to health, right to food, right to water, right to subsistence.
In fact I have to frame the actual violations to the OAS in terms of the instruments directly under the OAS, although the OAS can look in general at the international law that relates.
In a curious sense, the Geneva Conventions end up being what the United States would have to argue as a defense, which of course they can't because they have violated the Geneva Conventions.
Tony Blair departs No10 Downing Street. 

Blair rejected a call for an independent inquiry into civilian deaths in Iraq, saying 'terrorists and insurgents' were to blame for fatalities.

Photo: AFP/Jim Watson
Tony Blair departs No10 Downing Street.
Blair rejected a call for an independent inquiry into civilian deaths in Iraq, saying 'terrorists and insurgents' were to blame for fatalities.
The Geneva Conventions might excuse a loss of life if it were legitimate, what they call collateral damage.
You can't have legitimate collateral damage excuse when you have attacked something that's off limits.
But say it was a military base, and the United States fired on a military base, civilian people who were doing the laundry were coming in with their laundry truck and they get hit, that's a loss of life but the Organization of American States will not call it an actionable loss of life because the United States was legally entitled to fire on that military base.
That there might have been some civilians around doesn't turn it into a civilian target.
Mike McCormick:    The current U.S. administration has made some claims with calling it part of the 'War on Terror,' and certain parts of the Geneva Convention don't apply to us because of this special 'War on Terror.'
Karen Parker:    Well that is total bogus.
I am appalled that members of Congress aren't speaking out on this.
All I can conclude is none of them know armed conflict law and they are putting themselves and their constituents and their country in huge, huge, disadvantage by not even being able to tell a war from a not-war.
They can't tell the difference between a war and terrorism.
People fighting an occupying force are combatants in a war of self-determination.
Whether you like it or not, whether you like them or not.
The United States is an occupying power in a sovereign state and people have a right to resist an occupying force.
And that resistance is of course governed by armed conflict law:  the Geneva Convention, the Hague Conventions, all the rules of armed conflict.
Mustapha Ahmed Abed lost his leg in the attack by U.S. troops on city of Fallujah.

Here he is cradled by a male relative, as his mother lies in a near by bed at the Naaman hospital in Baghdad.

Photo: Occupying forces photo/Reuters, 11/10/04
Mustapha Ahmed Abed lost his leg in the attack by U.S. troops on city of Fallujah.
Here he is cradled by a male relative, as his mother lies in a near by bed at the Naaman hospital in Baghdad.
Aljazeera Tuesday 01 March 2005
US forces in Iraq have in the last few days killed several Iraqis — including a woman and her children — during the course of an extensive military operation in al-Anbar province.
The situation is tense since the US forces launched Operation River Blitz on Tuesday, Aljazeera has learned.
In the province's city of Ramadi, two Iraqis including a woman along with her children were killed in US fire.
While three civilians were injured when US troops opened fire on their car, the woman and children were killed when the airforce bombed a house in the al-Bufarraj district, north of the city.
The US action has enraged the citizens, particularly since troops killed at least five civilians and injured 16 in firing.
The forces surrounded Hiyt city, imposing curfew for the seventh consecutive night.
Aljazeera learned that the US forces had arrested many people including the medical staff of the Hiyt general hospital.
Aljazeera
Body of loved one in Falluja.

Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Picture: http://dahrjamailiraq.com/
   Body of loved one in Falluja
Interview with Attorney Karen Parker
We're using tanks and soldiers.
Terrorists are terrorists because they can't carry out military operations.  They don't have an army.
You don't fight someone whose weapons are airplanes running into buildings with an army.
You don't know where they are even.
You fight terrorism by trying to find the terrorists.
You don't fight terrorism by tanks roaming through a foreign country that had nothing to with terrorism on the United States.
And when the people resist, that's not terrorism.  That's spontaneous uprising.
The useful term in armed conflict law is levée en masse.
But its actually gone beyond levée en masse because the opposition, or sometimes the United States calls them insurgent forces, when they don't say terrorists, the insurgent forces are getting more and more organized.
They are carrying out organized actions.
That said, it does not mean that there are acts of terrorism occurring in Iraq, by all parties.
Setting a bomb off in a civilian market place is an act of terrorism in armed conflict, and that's also prohibited by the Geneva Conventions.

A Wounded 16 month-old child cries while lying in a Baghdad hospital.

He was injured as the house was damaged by U.S. fire, when U.S. forces attacked Falluja, November 14, 2004.

Image: Jihad Awartani, Ad Dustour, 11/21/04
A Wounded 16 month-old child cries while lying in a Baghdad hospital.
He was injured as the house was damaged by U.S. fire, when U.S. forces attacked Falluja, November 14, 2004.
Times corrects a minor error, ignores the big one
A report by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, June 6, 2007
Reviewing the London-based anti-Iraq War play Fallujah, New York Times reporter Jane Perlez wrote (5/29/07),
"The denunciations of the United States are severe, particularly in the scenes that deal with the use of napalm in Fallujah, an allegation made by left-wing critics of the war but never substantiated."
She followed that complaint by reporting that the play's writer and director, Jonathan Holmes, "makes no pretense of objectivity," paraphrasing him as saying that he "strove for authority more than authenticity."
Unfortunately for the Times, which does make a pretense of objectivity, the U.S. government did use the modern equivalent of napalm in Iraq.   In a 2003 interview in the
San Diego Union-Tribune (8/5/03), Marine Col. James Alles described the use of Mark 77 firebombs on targets in Iraq, saying, "We napalmed both those approaches."
While the Pentagon makes a distinction between the Mark 77 and napalm — the chemical formulation is slightly different, being based on kerosene rather than gasoline — it acknowledged to the Union-Tribune that the new weapon is routinely referred to as napalm because "its effect upon the target is remarkably similar."
"You can call it something other than napalm, but it's napalm," military analyst John Pike told the paper.
In a column that appeared before his play premiered (
London Guardian, 4/4/07), Fallujah playwright and director Jonathan Holmes referred to it as a "napalm derivative."
But the major controversy over the use of incendiary weapons in Fallujah involved not napalm but white phosphorus.
As with napalm, U.S. officials initially denied that white phosphorus had been used as a weapon there.
In London, U.S. Ambassador Robert Tuttle told the Independent (11/15/05) that "U.S. forces do not use napalm or white phosphorus as weapons," only "as obscurants or smoke screens and for target marking."
After it was discovered that the military journal Field Artillery (3-4/05) had quoted veterans of the Fallujah campaign boasting that white phosphorus was such "an effective and versatile munition" that they "saved our WP for lethal missions," however, the U.S. government was forced to backtrack.
"Yes, it was used as an incendiary weapon against enemy combatants," Col. Barry Venable told the BBC (11/15/05).
As Seth Ackerman documented (
Extra!, 3-4/06), the New York Times had accepted the initial denials of the use of white phosphorus as a weapon.
An article about U.S. intelligence monitoring the foreign press (11/13/05) cited such claims as examples of the flimsy anti-American charges in the overseas media, noting that "the mainstream American news media" had "largely ignored the claim," since its "reporters had witnessed the fighting [in Fallujah] and apparently seen no evidence” of white phosphorus weaponry.
After the Pentagon admitted using white phosphorus, however, the Times ran a strong editorial (
11/29/05) calling for a ban on its use. "All of us, including Americans, are safer in a world in which certain forms of conduct are regarded as too inhumane even for war.   That is why...the United States should stop using white phosphorus."
Independent correspondent Dahr Jamail, whose reporting from Fallujah inspired one of the play's characters, wrote to the New York Times to take issue with Perlez's dismissal of the play's references to napalm.   Jamail pointed out that the use of white phosphorus in Fallujah was an "'allegation'...confirmed by the Pentagon itself nearly one year after it was initially reported by myself, as well as other outlets in the Middle East."
Jamail also noted out that Perlez had incorrectly described him as Canadian, when he is actually a U.S. citizen.   The Times ran a correction (6/7/07) on the nationality mistake, but declined to correct the more serious error of dismissing the U.S.'s incendiary weapons attacks as an "allegation" that was "never substantiated."
If Perlez meant to say that the U.S. military had only confirmed the use of a napalm-like weapon elsewhere in Iraq, not in Fallujah, while the only incendiary weapon admitted to have been used in Fallujah was white phosphorus, then that's a very slender technicality with which to call into question the "objectivity" and "authenticity" of a playwright.
It was good of the Times, in its November 2005 editorial, to condemn the use of inhumane weapons that burn their victims alive.   But it's too bad that its reporter didn't recall that editorial when presenting the use of similar weaponry as an unsubstantiated left-wing charge.
And it's especially unfortunate that, even when this lapse was pointed out to the paper, it couldn't bring itself to correct the record, choosing to be fastidious only when it comes to secondary details like nationality.
———————
If you feel compelled to take action regarding this issue,
click here
Posted by Dahr_Jamail at June 11, 2007 10:44 PM
Body of loved one in Falluja.

Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Picture: http://dahrjamailiraq.com/
   Body of loved one in Falluja
Interview with Attorney Karen Parker
The people also have to understand that from the perspective of armed conflict law, the military forces of the occupying powers, and the, it would be called I supposed a quisling government, a government we installed, the military forces and police forces acting as military forces are targets.
They are legal military targets.  That's who you can target.  You can't target the hospital.  You can't target the market.  You can't target the school.  You can't target the mosque.
Mike McCormick:    What has been the reaction so far of your petition?
Karen Parker:    It's gaining momentum as far as media attention, attention of groups that are opposed to the war or appalled at what is going on:  the Veteran's for Peace, there are so many organizations, the Organization of Soldiers Returned from Iraq, which are the organization you want to get.
I want to have veterans organizations knowledgeable about this situation because they have connections with the soldiers and it is the soldiers that ultimately have to refuse these orders.
So that when they see what it really means to attack a hospital, they know if they are ordered to attack a hospital, they should say, "No sir, I am not allowed to do that sir, due to the Geneva Convention Article 51, sir."
An individual soldier isn't going to do that but a platoon might, and so it is most important that the military groups are onto this, and they are increasingly on to it at least all the ones that I know about are posting it, writing about it, contacting me.
What is really distressing is that members of Congress who are presumed to know, who are charged with knowing, and at the degree of violation, these are grave breaches. These are war crimes of the highest degree.
Their silence can be viewed as complicity.
It's amazing to why they Democrats haven't spoken out about war crimes.
War crimes are grounds for impeachment.
As I say, it doesn't get worse than this.
 
“Unfortunately, millions of Americans are unable to accept the fact their government is engaged in massive war crimes in Iraq.
   It does not matter what evidence is presented?”
       Obliterated Fallujah      
       "The horrid case against my country"       
 
Kewe comment:
We have included the article below on the site for what the articles states.
But there was a reluctance.
For this does express an opinion from a military point of view, and this site if nothing else, has come to view military force, from whatever country, as being against the people of the world — in totality.
Remember — the soldier is speaking with a language that has been indoctrinated into him despite his attempt at rejecting such.
Words such as 'insurgent'   'strongest military in the world'   only help the elite who control the US government, and control your taxes if your pay into this 'military — police' tax system. 
                          To rebel is right, to disobey is a duty, to act is necessary !
twenty
twenty
         Letter from a US soldier              
"This wasn’t a war, it was a massacre"
Letter from a GI in Falluja:
THE FOLLOWING letter from a U.S. soldier stationed in Iraq, known as hEkLe, powerfully conveys the terror of the U.S. assault on Falluja.
It was published in GI Special, a daily Internet newsletter that gathers news and information helpful to soldiers and military families.
You can find an archive of the GI Special updated with each new issue at www.militaryproject.org and several fellow soldiers have a Web log that they regularly update with essays at www.ftssoldier.blogspot.com .
THESE ARE ugly times for the U.S. military in Iraq.
It seems everywhere you turn, more and more troops are being killed and maimed in vicious encounters with determined rebel fighters.
The insurgency is mounting incredibly in such places as Baghdad, Mosul and Baquba, using more advanced techniques and weaponry associated with a well-organized guerilla campaign.
Even in the massively destroyed city of Falluja, rebel forces are starting to reappear with a callous determination to win or die trying.
Many critics and political pundits are starting to realize that this war is, in many aspects, un-winnable.
And why should anyone think that a complete victory is possible?
Conventionally, our U.S. forces win territory here or there, killing a plethora of civilians as well as insurgents with each new boundary conquered.
However, such as the recent case in Falluja, the rebel fighters have returned like a swarm of angry hornets, attacking with a vicious frenzy.
I was in Falluja during the last two days of the final assault.
My mission was much different from that of the brave and weary infantry and Marines involved in the major fighting.
I was on an escort mission, accompanied by a squad whose task it was to protect a high brass figure in the combat zone.
This particularly arrogant officer went to the last battle in the same spirit of an impartial spectator checking out the fourth quarter of a high school football game.
UK Terror State Blair and Brown
Once we got to the Marine-occupied Camp Falluja and saw artillery being fired into town, the man suddenly became desperate to play an active role in the battle that would render Falluja to ashes.
It was already rumored that all he really wanted was his trigger time, perhaps to prove that he is the toughest cowboy west of the Euphrates.
Guys like him are a dime a dozen in the army: a career soldier who spent the first 20 years of his service patrolling the Berlin Wall or guarding the DMZ between North and South Korea.
This sort of brass may have been lucky to serve in the first Gulf War, but in all actuality spent very little time shooting rag heads.
For these trigger-happy tough guys, the last two decades of Cold War hostilities built into a war frenzy of stark emptiness, fizzling out almost completely with the Clinton administration.
But this is the New War, a never-ending, action-packed “Red Scare” in which the communist threat of yesteryear was simply replaced with the white knuckled tension of today’s “war on terrorism.”
The younger soldiers who grew up in relatively peaceful times interpret the mentality of the careerists as one of making up for lost opportunities.
To the elder generation of trigger pullers, this is the real deal; the chance to use all the cool toys and high speed training that has been stored away since the ’70s for something tangibly useful...and it’s about goddamn time.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —
HOWEVER, UPON reaching the front lines, a safety standard was in effect stating that the urban combat was extremely intense.
The lightest armored vehicles allowed in sector were Bradley tanks.
Taking a glance at our armored humvees, this commander insisted that our section would be fine.
Even though the armored humvees are very stout and nearly impenetrable against small-arms fire, they usually don’t hold up well against rocket attacks and roadside bombs, like a heavily armored tank will.
The reports from within the war zone indicated heavy rocket attacks, with an armed insurgent waiting on every corner for a soft target such as trucks.
In the end, the overzealous officer was urged not to infiltrate into sector with only three trucks, for it would be a death wish during those dangerous twilight hours.
It was suggested that in the morning, after the air strikes were complete, he could move in and “inspect the damage.”
Even as the sun was setting over the hazy orange horizon, artillery was pounding away at the remaining 12 percent of the already devastated Falluja.
Many units were pulled out for the evening in preparation of a full-scale air strike that was scheduled to last for up to 12 hours.
Our squad was sitting on top of our parked humvees, manning the crew-served machine guns and scanning the urban landscape for enemy activity.
This was supposed to be a secured forward operating area, right on the edge of the combat zone.
However, with no barbed wire perimeter set up and only a few scattered tanks serving as protection, one was under the assumption that if someone missed a minor detail while on guard, some serious shit could go down.
One soldier informed me that only two nights prior, an insurgent was caught sneaking around the bullet-ridden houses to our immediate west.
He was armed with a rocket-propelled grenade and was laying low on his advance towards the perimeter.
One of the tanks spotted him through its night vision and hastily shot him into three pieces.
Indeed, though it was safe enough to smoke a cigarette and relax, one had to remain diligently aware of his surroundings if he planned on making it through the night.
As the evening wore on and the artillery continued, a new gruesome roar filled the sky.
The fighter jets were right on time and made their grand appearance with a series of massive air strikes.
Between the pernicious bombs and fierce artillery, the sky seemed as though it were on fire for several minutes at a time.
First, you would see a blaze of light in the horizon, like lightning hitting a dynamite warehouse, and then hear the massive explosion that would turn your stomach, rattle your eyeballs and compress itself deep within your lungs.
Although these massive bombs were being dropped no further than five kilometers away, it felt like it was happening right in front of your face.
At first, it was impossible not to flinch with each unexpected boom, but after scores of intense explosions, your senses became aware and complacent towards them.
At times, the jets would scream menacingly low over the city and open fire with smaller missiles meant for extreme accuracy.
This is what Top Gun, in all its glory and silver screen acclaim, seemed to be lacking in the movie’s high budget sound effects.
UK Terror State War Criminal Blair
These air-deployed missiles make a banshee-like squeal, sort of like a bottle rocket fueled with plutonium, and then suddenly would become inaudible.
Seconds later, the colossal explosion would rip the sky open and hammer devastatingly into the ground, sending flames and debris pummeling into the air.
And as always, the artillery--some rounds were high explosive, some were illumination rounds, some were reported as being white phosphorus (the modern-day napalm).
Occasionally, on the outskirts of the isolated impact area, you could hear tanks firing machine guns and blazing their cannons.
It was amazing that anything could survive this deadly onslaught. Suddenly, a transmission came over the radio approving the request for “bunker-busters.”
Apparently, there were a handful of insurgent compounds that were impenetrable by artillery.
At the time, I was unaware when these bunker-busters were deployed, but I was told later that the incredibly massive explosions were a direct result of these “final solution”-type missiles.
I continued to watch the final assault on Falluja throughout the night from atop my humvee.
It was interesting to scan the vast skies above with night-vision goggles.
Circling continuously overhead throughout the battle was an array of attack helicopters.
The most devastating were the Cobras and Apaches with their chain-gun missile launchers.
Through the night vision, I could see them hovering around the carnage, scanning the ground with an infrared spotlight that seemed to reach for miles.
Once a target was identified, a rapid series of hollow blasts would echo through the skies, and from the ground came a “rat-a-tatting” of explosions, like a daisy chain of supercharged black cats during a Fourth of July barbeque.
More artillery, more tanks, more machine gun fire, ominous death-dealing fighter planes terminating whole city blocks at a time... this wasn’t a war, it was a massacre!
— — — — — — — — — — —
AS I look back on the air strikes that lasted well into the next morning, I cannot help but be both amazed by our modern technology and disgusted by its means.
It occurred to me many times during the siege that while the Falluja resistance was boldly fighting us with archaic weapons from the Cold War, we were soaring far above their heads, dropping Thor’s fury with a destructive power and precision that may as well been nuclear.
It was like the Iraqis were bringing a knife to a tank fight.
And yet, the resistance toiled on, many fighting until their deaths. What determination!
Some soldiers call them stupid for even thinking they have a chance in hell to defeat the strongest military in the world, but I call them brave.
It’s not about fighting to win an immediate victory. And what is a conventional victory in a non-conventional war?
It seems overwhelmingly obvious that this is no longer within the United States hands.
We reduced Falluja to rubble.
We claimed victory and told the world we held Falluja under total and complete control.
Our military claimed very few civilian casualties and listed thousands of insurgents dead.
CNN and Fox News harped and cheered on the television that the battle of Falluja would go down in history as a complete success, and a testament to the United States’ supremacy on the modern battlefield.
However, after the dust settled, and generals sat in cozy offices smoking their victory cigars, the front lines in Falluja exploded again with indomitable mortar, rocket, and small-arm attacks on U.S. and coalition forces.
Recent reports indicate that many insurgents have resurfaced in the devastated city of Falluja.
We had already claimed the situation under control and were starting to turn our attention to the other problem city of Mosul.
Suddenly, we were backtracking our attention to Falluja.
US made Howitzer being directed at the people of Fullujah, Iraq
Did the Department of Defense and the national press lie to the public and claim another preemptive victory?
Not necessarily so.
Conventionally, we won the battle -- how could anyone argue that?
We destroyed an entire city and killed thousands of its occupants.
But the main issue that both the military and public forget to analyze is that this war, beyond any shadow of a doubt, is completely guerrilla.
Sometimes I wonder if the West Point-graduated officers have ever studied the intricate simplicity and effectiveness of guerrilla warfare.
During the course of this war, I have occasionally asked a random lieutenant or a captain if he at any time has even browsed through Che Guevara’s Guerrilla Warfare.
Almost half of them admit that they have not.
This I find to be amazing!
Here we have many years of guerrilla warfare ahead of us, and our military’s leadership seems dangerously unaware of what it all means!
Anyone can tell you that a guerrilla fighter is one who uses hit-and-run techniques to attempt a breakdown of a stronger conventional force.
However, what is more important to a guerrilla campaign are the political forces that drive it.
Throughout history, many guerrilla armies have been successful; our own country and its fight for independence cannot be excluded.
We should have learned a lesson in guerrilla fighting with the Vietnam War only 30 years ago, but history has a funny way of repeating itself.
The Vietnam War was a perfect example of how quick, deadly assaults on conventional troops over a long period of time can lead to an unpopular public view of the war, thus ending it.
Che Guevara stressed in his book Guerrilla Warfare that the most important factor in a guerrilla campaign is popular support.
With that, victory is almost completely assured.
The Iraqis already have many of the main ingredients of a successful insurrection.
Not only do they have a seemingly endless supply of munitions and weapons, they have the advantage to blend into their environment, whether that environment is a crowded marketplace or a thickly vegetated palm grove.
The Iraqi insurgent has utilized these advantages to the fullest, but his most important and relevant advantage is the popular support from his own countrymen.
What our military and government needs to realize is that every mistake we make is an advantage to the Iraqi insurrection.
Every time an innocent man, woman or child is murdered in a military act, deliberate or not, the insurgent grows stronger.
Even if an innocent civilian is slain at the hands of his or her own freedom fighter, that fighter is still viewed as a warrior of the people, while the occupying force will ultimately be blamed as the responsible perpetrator.
Everything about this war is political...every ambush, every bombing, every death.
When a coalition worker or soldier is abducted and executed, this only adds encouragement and justice to the dissident fervor of the Iraq public, while angering and demoralizing the occupier.
Our own media will prove to be our downfall as well.
Every time an atrocity is revealed through our news outlets, our grasp on this once secular nation slips away.
As America grows increasingly disturbed by the images of carnage and violent death of her own sons in arms, its government loses the justification to continue the bloody debacle.
Since all these traits are the conventional power’s unavoidable mistakes, the guerrilla campaign will surely succeed.
In Iraq’s case, complete destruction of the United States military is impossible, but through perseverance, the insurgency will drive us out.
This will prove to be the inevitable outcome of the war.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —
WE LOST many soldiers in the final battle for Falluja, and many more were seriously wounded.
It seems unfair that even after the devastation we wreaked on this city just to contain it, many more troops will die in vain to keep it that way.
I saw the look in the eyes of a reconnaissance scout while I talked to him after the battle.
His stories of gore and violent death were unnerving.
The sacrifices that he and his whole platoon had made were infinite.
They fought every day with little or no sleep, very few breaks and no hot meals.
For obvious reasons, they never could manage to find time to e-mail their mothers to let them know that everything turned out okay.
Some of the members of his platoon will never get the chance to reassure their mothers, because now, those soldiers are dead.
The look in his eyes as he told some of the stories were deep and weary, even perturbed.
He described in accurate detail how some enemy combatants were blown to pieces by army-issued bazookas, some had their heads shot off by a 50 caliber bullet, others were run over by tanks as they stood defiantly in the narrow streets, firing an AK-47.
The soldier told me how one of his favorite sergeants died right in front of him.
He was taking cover behind an alley wall, and as he emerged to fire his M4 rifle, he was shot through the abdomen with a rocket-propelled grenade.
The grenade itself exploded and sent shrapnel into the narrator’s leg. He showed me where a chunk of burned flesh was torn from his left thigh.
He ended his conversation saying that he was just a dumb kid from California who never thought joining the army would send him straight to hell.
He told me he was tired as fuck and wanted a shower.
Then he slowly walked away, cradling a rifle under his arm.
http://www.socialistworker.org/2004-2/522/522_07_FromFalluja.shtml
http://www.ftssoldier.blogspot.com/
http://www.militaryproject.org
Sunday 5th December 2004

uruknet.info
اوروكنت.إنفو
informazione dall'iraq occupato
information from occupied iraq
أخبار منالعراق المحتلة
THE SCIENCE OF EVIL
ITS USE FOR POLITICAL PURPOSES
CarolynBaker.Org
War criminal Blair speaking before other war criminals including two thirds of the British Labour Party in the UK parliament.

Blair admitted lying about the number of bodies in mass graves

Photo: www.uruknet.de/
Blair admitted to lying about the number of bodies in mass graves
Our government wouldn’t harm us; our government has our best interests at heart
Canada’s Red Pill press has recently published psychologist Andrew M. Lobaczewski’s book Political Ponerology (Red Pill Press, Canada, 1998 and 2006) in which the author expounds on his observations that during his years of clinical work in Poland, he noticed a high correlation between acts that most people would label as "evil" and various pathologies.
The most apt diagnostic labeling of these individuals in modern psychological jargon would be sociopathic, the most important characteristic of which is the seeming absence of a conscience or empathy in relation to other living beings.
Lobaczewski and some of his Eastern European colleagues working under Soviet rule decided to take this study to a higher level and researched how sociopathy was playing out in government, in business, and in other social groups.
Flechettes used by U.S. military, displayed in Saigon
Flechettes used by U.S. military, displayed in Saigon "War Crimes Museum," as referred to by locals
Evil adjusted for political purposes
Political ponerology (originating from the Greek word for evil, poneros) is a science on the nature of evil adjusted for political purposes which ultimately on a larger scale results in a pathocracy.
The research indicates that sociopaths are found in all races, ethnicities, and creeds, and that no group is immune to them.
Sociopaths constitute, according to the author, about 6% of the population of any given group.
Red Pill’s editor states that, "Political Ponerology is a book that offers a horrifying glimpse into the structure underlying our governments, our biggest corporations, and even our system of law."
After I read the book, a number of nagging questions about the policies and practices of government and corporate officials began to answer themselves in that Lobaczewski’s analysis goes to the heart of why the United States government has become a criminal enterprise hell bent on dominating the world and annihilating vast quantities of human beings globally and domestically.
When I first began the book I was more than a little put off by Lobaczewski’s European style of writing — his wordiness and his succinctness - challenged approach.
Nevertheless, as I kept reading, and I must admit, struggling with his sentences, I grew increasingly grateful for the book and the friend who gave it to me.
As a result, a few of the author’s fundamental concepts cry out to be shared, and this article is an attempt to do just that.
Lobaczewski first points out that societies are the most vulnerable to evil during good times.
"During good times," he writes, "people progressively lose sight of the need for profound reflection, introspection, knowledge of others, and an understanding of life’s complicated laws." (P.85)
Certainly, in my lifetime, I have not witnessed an American society willing to reflect and wrestle with the complexities of existence since the Vietnam War.
Although much of the protest and activism of the sixties was naively myopic, the tension and angst of the era drove a majority of individuals in the United States to look deeper within themselves than they otherwise might have.
Men holding handfuls of Flechettes used by the U.S. military in Fallujah.

Photo taken May 19, 2004. 

Photo: www.dahr.org/
Men holding handfuls of Flechettes used by the U.S. military in Fallujah, Iraq
Photo taken May 19, 2004.
Two million Iraqis who died due to U.S.-imposed embargo
Following upon the heels of the war, of course, came Watergate, and further confirmation that governments always betray their own citizens and always lie about doing so.
Then as the ME-generation seventies offered us the deceptions of peace and honest government, the groundwork for the current horrors domestically and internationally were being laid.
America was war-weary, and smarting from the wounds of Watergate, acting out Lobaczewski’s assertion that "During good times, the search for truth becomes uncomfortable because it reveals inconvenient facts." (85)
On the other hand, he states, "Suffering, effort, and mental activity during times of imminent bitterness lead to progressive, generally heightened, regeneration of lost values, which results in human progress." (P.87)
Conversely, "The cycle of happy, peaceful times favors a narrowing of the world view and an increase in egotism…."
Well, Jung said it long before Lobaczewski: Consciously analyzed suffering produces growth while letting nothing roll besides the good times produces stagnation and delusion.(87)
As we continued to stage various coups around the world
Perhaps no generation in American history has ever been so vulnerable to egotism as that of the seventies.
It became known as the ME generation for a reason—not only because Americans became more personally narcissistic but also because internationally, in spite of losing our first war and weathering the Watergate scandal, we proceeded to demonstrate our superiority as we continued to stage various coups around the world and wage economic warfare on developing nations, setting the stage for Reagan’s ascent to power in the eighties and the polarization of ourselves as the savior in contrast to the "evil empire" of anyone else who dared to disagree.
It is exactly at those times of ego-delirium that nations render themselves deaf, dumb, and blind to conscience-less sociopaths who seduce them into policies and practices that are lethal for themselves and the rest of the world.
Lack of reflection by definition produces human beings devoid of discernment.
One enormous problem I have with Lobaczewski’s elucidation of his theory is his use of "normal" to describe people who are not sociopaths.
I wish he had used a different term since "normal" is so amorphous and laden with the naïve assumption that there is such a thing as a human being who is not dysfunctional in at least one aspect of his/her life.
Nevertheless, he emphasizes that so-called "normal" individuals cannot comprehend the mind or behavior of the sociopath and are thus especially vulnerable to being harmed by them—hence the principal reason for writing a book on Ponerology, namely, to educate non-sociopaths about the pathology.
The author uses the term "spellbinders" to describe psychological snake charmers who appear to be saviors, enlightened thinkers/politicians, even activists who present themselves as possessing insights based on research uniquely carried out by themselves or information gained through extraordinary channels to which no one else has access. This could also apply to cult leaders like Warren Jeffs and Jim Jones.
The U.S. government couldn’t possibly have orchestrated the 9/11 attacks
Yet, the author warns the reader that our own unconscious processes can cause us to block out the "red flags" that may arise in dealing with sociopaths.
"Unconscious psychological processes outstrip conscious reasoning, both in time and in scope, which makes many psychological phenomena possible." (152)
Thus the denial that prohibits some individuals from seeing the darkest truths of what a sociopath is trying to promote, i.e.,
"Our government wouldn’t harm us.
Our government has our best interests at heart.
No president could get away with that.
The rule of law is still at work in America.
Fascism can’t happen here.
The U.S. government couldn’t possibly have orchestrated the 9/11 attacks.
If 9/11 were orchestrated by the U.S. government, too many people would have been involved for it to remain a secret",
And on and on ad infinitum.
Lobaczewski asserts that every society should teach its members proper thinking skills and how to detect the red flags of sociopathy.
Teaching critical thinking skills in the educational process is one step in that direction, but in America’s No Child Left Behind gargantuan dumbing down project, even this first step is overwhelmingly absent.
The author states that "an ever-strengthening network of psychopathic and related individuals gradually starts to dominate, overshadowing the others." (192)
Small pathological minority takes control
This situation rapidly devolves into a pathocracy or a system wherein a small pathological minority takes control over a society of normal people. (193)
The book’s editor, Laura Knight-Jadczyk, in her footnotes does not hesitate to name Karl Rove, Dick Cheney, and Donald Rumsfeld, under the tutelage of Leo Strauss, as principal players in America’s twenty-first century pathocracy.
Tragically, according to the author, "Pathocracy progressively paralyzes everything [and]…progressively intrudes everywhere and dulls everything."(195)
If this all sounds very grim, and it is, Lobaczewski encourages us by emphasizing that, "If the ponerogenic activity of pathological factors—deviant individuals and their activities—is subjectged to conscious controls of a scientific, individual, and societal nature, we can counteract evil as effectively as by means of persistent calls to respect moral values." (180)
In other words, the author insists, crusading for moral values alone, can neither prevent nor expose ponerogenic activity.
In fact, he asserts, it can exacerbate such activity by distracting attention from the most ghastly forms of evil to that which is not evil at all or presents with a more complex and less blatant quality.
We have only to witness the ideology and rhetoric of the religious right in this country to observe a stellar example of the latter.
Professing to be a "culture of life" it is implacably obsessed with death, apocalyptic violence, hell fire and brimstone.
It serves no purpose, essentially, in the current milieu but to foster and perpetuate pathocracy.
Political Ponerology is an invaluable work that every human being striving to become conscious, should read, not only for its expose of the pathology of the individuals currently in control of the United States government, but also the light it may shed on individuals closer to home, some of whom may be friends, fellow-activists, business or civic leaders.
The book’s purpose is not to incite paranoia, but to cultivate discernment and buttress our trust of our innate intuition in order to navigate the daunting manifestations of evil that surround us in the twenty-first century.
Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Photo: http://dahrjamailiraq.com/
   Body of loved one in Falluja
Mike McCormick:    What would you like listeners to do?
Karen Parker:    Well I would certainly urge listeners to write letters to the editor, from wherever they are listening and let people know what the United States has done in Fallujah to the medical facilities, the clinics, the personnel, the patients, is a war crime.
Is a grave breach of the Geneva Conventions: called wanton loss of life and destruction unwarranted by military necessity.
There is no military necessity in a hospital.
You don't even come close to that excuse.
Inform the general public of the cost to them, not only in world public opinion but in their pocket book.
I would also encourage listeners to notify their Members of Congress and ask why they haven't spoken up.
It's a war crime.
Are they aware of the petition.
It has certainly been out there.
Groups have been calling their Members of Congress.  I haven't heard one speak up yet, which is shocking.  And I know they have seen the pictures.  The picture that was in the San Francisco paper had been on the news times.
We are a country at war.  Our legislator has to know the rules of war.
If they don't know the rules of war, and are letting the State Department, and the Defense Department determine what they are and then brief them, that is dereliction of duty.
If we are going to war we had better know the rules of war because we are putting ourselves as a government obviously in financial jeopardy because of financial settlements and lawsuits.  But we are also training a military that commits war crimes.
One of the serious issues for the United States is that when these soldiers come back they are walking time bombs.
You don't engage in this type of operation without serious difficulty unless you are already a psychopath,
Now I've seen photographs of U.S. tanks with corpses, with hands tied behind their back.  What risk where they if their hands were tied behind their back, clearly dead, and they are hung on tanks.
They're hanging bodies that they kill hanging on tanks, and gloating and parading around with them.
That in itself is a war crime.  You cannot desecrate corpses.  In fact you are supposed to seek out and find the dead and help notify the next-of-kin or allow the International Red Cross or other Red Cross personnel from the local Red Cross to identify bodies and locate next of kin.
It's been more than two weeks and there are still bodies rotting in the street that have been eaten by dogs.
There are dead bodies on tanks, who I am sure when they start smelling they will find another dead body to put on the tank.
But this kind of depravity...this is worse than the torture and its affecting far more people.
This is worse than the torture in Abu Ghraib, in the jails.
These are whole platoons, large numbers of U.S. forces either seeing these acts happening, participating in them, not trying to stop them.
There are a lot of people who stormed Fallujah General Hospital.
There are a lot of people in those tanks, roaming around, shooting at the sites, shooting up ambulances.
Psychological problems from those who aren't already psychopaths are going to haunt us, and all of us.  They are certainly going to haunt their families and their communities, their children.
And imagine, if your child, who might be two now, reach eighteen and actually study the Iraq war, say Dad or Mom, did you do any of that?
Very, very serious to do that to our men.
We have infected our fighting men.  We have ordered them to carry out war crimes, and nobody really does that lightly
Fallujah war crimes — Graphic images.

Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons.

Picture: http://dahrjamailiraq.com/

   Body of loved one in Falluja
Mike McCormick:    Can the individuals on the U.S. side that do participate in war crimes, can they individually be held accountable from let's say the soldiers in the field that carry these out, all the way up the chain of command?
Karen Parker:    Yes, although it is preferable to give the charge to persons ordering, rather than those lower down in rank, but the superiors who orders is not defense. That's the International Law term.
Superior's orders is no defense.
However, all the high contracting parties to the Geneva Conventions have an obligation and duty to seek out violators and try them in their national courts, if possible.
The reason there is the International Criminal Court is that a lot of countries were hesitant about having trials in their own countries, so they established a neutral body so they wouldn't have to involve themselves in the politics of things.
But the Geneva Conventions do require all countries to seek out and try violators.
My guess is that people seeking out and trying violators are going to be more interested in the commanders than the ordinary forces in the field.
But it doesn't mean that some American GI who decides to take a trip to Paris, and someone recognizes him and he or she identifies themselves, maybe even wears a uniform, with a name on it, couldn't be tried.
We think however the best place to try to get actual remedies for victims is at the Organization of American States.
There are other places you can go to try and punish the violator, including our own courts.
We should have courts-martial for anyone who carried out these operations, particularly those who ordered them.
But my organizations are more interested in first of all preventing these types of war crimes by information and education on how wars should be fought.  What is off limits, but our real focus is victims, not punishment of the violator.
So this is a lawsuit for the victims.
Yes, the violators should be punished vis-à-vis paying for it.
But this is not a criminal proceeding against the specific violators.  It is against the country for doing it.
How can people find out more about your petition and your organization?
Well, Humanitarian Law Project has a website:
      http://hlp.home.igc.org/      
Tuesday, 21 December, 2004
New jail abuse allegations hit US
Abu Ghraib Prison, Iraq
Some documents post-date the Abu Ghraib scandal
Fresh allegations have emerged of serious mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners by US military personnel.
Memos between FBI officials detailing abuses, some dated after the Abu Ghraib jail scandal, were released as part of a lawsuit against the government.
Others allege serious mistreatment of prisoners from the Afghan war held in the US military base at Guantanamo Bay.
The American Civil Liberties Union brought the case to determine whether the US was mistreating prisoners.
ACLU executive director Anthony Romero said the documents raised grave questions about who was to blame for widespread detainee abuse.
"Top government officials can no longer hide from public scrutiny by pointing the finger at a few low-ranking soldiers," hesaid.
Last week documents released for the case threw up fresh revelations of abuse in Iraq by US marines, 13 of whom have been convicted and some jailed.
'Executive order'
The documents, which were obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, are mostly made up of communications between FBI agents concerned at seeing interrogation techniques they are prohibited from using in their own investigations.
The detainee was almost unconscious on the floor with a pile of hair next to him — he had been pulling his own hair out throughout the night
Text of FBI memo on Guantanamo
One of the memorandums released on Monday provided the account of an agent who observed "serious physical abuses" in Iraq.
It was dated 24 June — two months after the extent of abuse at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison was revealed — and was marked "urgent" and sent to FBI Director Robert Mueller.
It described strangulation, beatings and the placing of lit cigarettes into detainees' ears.
Another document said an executive order signed by President George W Bush had authorised techniques such as "sleep management", stress positions, use of military dogs and sensory deprivation.
The White House was quick to respond to this allegation, saying: "What the FBI agent wrote in the e-mail is wrong. There is no executive order on interrogation techniques."
Impersonation
A document relating to Guantanamo suggests that detainees — suspected Taleban and al-Qaeda fighters captured during thewar in Afghanistan — were shackled to the floor in foetal positions for more than 24 hours at a time, left without food and water and allowed to defecate on themselves.
One detainee's air conditioning was turned off in an unventilated room, making it unbearably hot, it was reported.
"The detainee was almost unconscious on the floor with a pile of hair next to him," the memo said. "He had apparently been literally pulling his own hair out throughout the night."
Other allegations contained in the e-mails include:
The Pentagon has not commented on the latest allegations of abuse, but spokesman Bryan Whitman denied that Mr Wolfowitz had approved impersonation techniques.
The department has also said in relation to previous cases that it did not tolerate abusive tactics.
Some allegations in the documents are under investigation, the Pentagon added.
November 3, 2005
Bush — he burns them to death with chemical weapons.
By Chris Floyd
U.S. President George W. Bush often complains about the "media filter" that distorts the true picture of his administration's accomplishments in Iraq.
And he's right.
For regardless of where you stand on Bush's policies in the region, it's undeniable that the political and commercial biases of the American press have consistently misrepresented the reality of the situation.
U.S. media ignored announcement of U.S. use of chemical weapons.
Here's an excellent example.
Earlier this month, the American media completely ignored an important announcement from an official of the Iraqi government concerning the oft-maligned U.S. operation to clear insurgents from the city of Fallujah last November. 
Although the press conference of Health Ministry investigator Dr. Khalid ash-Shaykhli was attended by representatives from The Washington Post, Knight-Ridder and more than 20 other international news outlets, nary a word of his team's thorough investigation into the truth about the battle made it through the filter's dense mesh.
Once again, the American public was denied the full story of one of President Bush's remarkable triumphs.
Dr. ash-Shaykhli's findings provided confirmation of earlier reports by many other Iraqis — reports that were also ignored by the arrogant filterers, who seem more interested in hearing from terrorists or anti-occupation extremists than ordinary Iraqis and those like Dr. ash-Shaykhli, who serve in the U.S.-backed interim government vetted and approved by President Bush.
But while the media elite turn up their noses at such riffraff, the testimony of these common folk and diligent public servants gives ample evidence of Bush's innovative method of liberating innocent Iraqis from tyranny:

He burns them to death with chemical weapons.

Dr. ash-Shaykhli was sent by the pro-American Baghdad government to assess health conditions in Fallujah, a city of 300,000 that was razed to the ground by a U.S. assault on a few hundred insurgents, most of whom slipped away long before the attack.
The ruin of the city was complete: Every single house was either destroyed (from 75 to 80 percent of the total) or heavily damaged.
The city's entire infrastructure — water, electricity, food, transport, medicine — was obliterated.
Indeed, the city's hospitals were among the first targets, in order to prevent medical workers from spreading "propaganda" about civilian casualties, U.S. officials said at the time.
Burning chemicals
Eyewitness accounts from the few survivors of the onslaught, which killed an estimated 1,200 noncombatants, have consistently reported the use of "burning chemicals" by American forces: horrible concoctions that roasted people alive with an unquenchable jellied fire, InterPress reported.
They also tell of whole quadrants of the city in which nothing was left alive, not even dogs or goats — quadrants that were sealed off by the victorious Americans for mysterious scouring operations after the battle.
Others told of widespread use of cluster bombs in civilian areas — a flagrant violation of the Geneva Conventions, but a standard practice throughout the war.
The few fragments of this information that made it through the ever-vigilant filter were instantly dismissed as anti-American propaganda, although they often came from civilians who had opposed the heavy-handed insurgent presence in the town.
Rejected as well were the innumerable horror stories of those who had seen their whole families — including women, children, the sick and the elderly — slaughtered in the "liberal rules of engagement" established by Bush's top brass. 
Most of the city was declared "weapons-free": military jargon meaning that soldiers could shoot "whatever they see — it's all considered hostile," The New York Times reported, in a story buried deep inside the paper.
Yet the ash-Shaykhli team — again, appointed by the Bush-backed government — confirmed the use of "mustard gas, nerve gas and other burning chemicals" by U.S. forces during the battle.
Dr. ash-Shaykhli said that survivors — still living in refugee camps, along with some 200,000 former Fallujah residents who fled before the assault — are now showing the medical effects of attack by chemical agents and the use of depleted uranium shells.
(American officials have admitted raining more than 250,000 pounds of toxin-tipped DU ammunition on Iraqis since the war began.)
The Pentagon has acknowledged using white phosphorus in Fallujah, but only for "illumination purposes."
It denied using napalm in the attack — but, in the course of that denial, it admitted that its earlier denials of using napalm elsewhere in Iraq were in fact false.
And individual Marines filing "After Action Reports" on the Internet for military enthusiasts back home have detailed the routine use of white phosphorus shells, propane bombs and "jellied gasoline" (also known as napalm) during direct tactical assaults in Fallujah.
Dr. ash-Shaykhli's findings — coming from a pro-American government, buttressed by reams of eyewitness testimony from ordinary Iraqi civilians — appear to be substantial, credible and worthy of further investigation by the U.S. press.
Certainly, the findings are more credible than the pre-war lies and fantasies about Saddam's phantom WMD, which the "media filter" lapped up from the Bush regime and amplified across the nation, rousing support for an unnecessary, illegal and immoral war.
Yet these serious new atrocity charges have not even been mentioned, much less examined.
Degeneration of American society is taking place
Behind the filter — with its basic story template of "always moral U.S. policies occasionally marred by a few bad apples" — a relentless degeneration of American society is taking place.
Brutality and atrocity are becoming normalized, systemized and rewarded.
The noble American ideal of transcendence — overcoming the beast within, seeking to embrace an ever-broader, ever-deeper, ever-richer vision of universal communion and individual worth — is dying at the hands of the resurgent barbarity championed and cultivated by the Bush regime.
Old-fashioned citizens are being replaced by "Bush Americans": wilfully ignorant, bellicose zealots, cringingly servile toward the powerful, violently hostile to all "outsiders."
Despite Bush's artful complaints, the media filter has served his degenerate purposes very well.
US occupation
Sadr City 2007, Iraq
Man cries after loved ones injured during US terror raid
More war, more terror, more authoritarian rule: The fire next time is almost here.
Annotations Napalm, Chemical Weapons Used at Fallujah: Iraqi Official
ILCA Online, March 7, 2005
Stories From Fallujah
Iraq Dispatch, Feb. 8, 2005
Fallujah, Tent City, Awaits Compensation
Informed Comment, March 13, 2005
Another Sad Day for Our Country
The American Independent, March 7, 2005

Iraqi Health Ministry Confirms Use of Prohibited Weapons in Attacks on al-Fallujah
Mafkarat al-Islam (Iraq), March 2, 2005

U.S. General From Abu Ghraib Scandal Promoted
Stars and Stripes, March 15, 2005

Odd Happenings in Fallujah
Electronic Iraq, Jan. 18, 2005
U.S. Denies Use of Napalm in Fallujah
U.S, International Information Programs Jan. 27, 2005
The Eyewitnesses Must Be Crazy
Antiwar.com, March 15, 2005
Life Under the Bombs in Iraq
TomDispatch, Feb. 2, 2005
TV News Turns Myopic: Profits Come First
Houston Chronicle, March 16, 2005
The Media Lobby
CorpWatch, March 11, 2005
Journalism, Infotainment and the Bottom-Line Business of Broadcasting
Buzzflash, March 17, 2005
Handmaiden of the State: The Role of Media in an Age of Empire
Antiwar.com, March 16, 2005
Extreme Cinema Verite: Soldiers Make Music Videos of Death and Destruction
Los Angeles Times, March 14, 2005
A War Crime in Real Time: Obliterating Fallujah
CounterPunch, Nov. 15, 2004
Inside Fallujah: One Family's Diary of Terror
Scotland Sunday Herald, Nov. 14, 2004
The Marine's Tale: 'I Felt We Were Committing Genocide
The Independent, May 23, 2004
Smoke and Corpses
BBC, Nov. 11, 2004
20 Doctors Killed in Strike on Clinic: Red Crescent
UN Integrated Regional Information Network, Nov. 10, 2004
US Strikes Raze Fallujah Hospital
BBC, Nov. 6, 2004
Ghost City Calls for Help
BBC, Nov. 13, 2004
Let Them Drink Sand: War Crimes in Fallujah
CounterPunch, Nov. 13, 2004
American Heroes
Baghdad Burning, Nov. 16, 2004
Beyond Embattled City, Rebels Roam Free
Los Angeles Times, Nov. 12, 2004
Administration Rejects Ruling on PR Videos
Washington Post, March 14, 2005
$226 Million in Government Ads Helped Pave the Way to War
Antiwar.com, May 28, 2004
© Copyright 2005, The Moscow Times.   All Rights Reserved.
The Iraq Invasion's Atrocities, Unearthing the Unthinkable
click here
US psyops — A Long History of America's Dark Side
click here
Unspeakable grief and horror
                        ...and the circus of deception continues...
Most recent 'Circus'    click here
— 2014
— 2013
— 2012
— 2011
— 2010
— 2009
— 2008
— 2007
— 2006
— 2005
— 2004
— 2003
Circus of Torture   2003 — now
He says, "You are quite mad, Kewe"
And of course I am.
Why, I don't believe any of it — not the bloody body, not the bloody mind, not even the bloody Universe, or is it bloody multiverse.
"It's all illusion," I say.   "Don't you know, my lad, my lassie.   The game!   The game, me girl, me boy!   Takes on interest, don't you know.   T'is me sport, till doest find a better!"
Pssssst — but all this stuff is happening down here
Let's change it!
To say hello:     hello[the at marker]Kewe.info
For Kewe's spiritual and metaphysical pages — click here
Part I












Afghanistan Most Recent



Published on Monday, July 4, 2005 by CommonDreams.org
by Sheldon Drobny
Justice O'Connor's decision in Bush v. Gore led to the current Bush administration's execution of war crimes and atrocities in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places in the Middle East that are as egregious as those committed by the Third Reich and other evil governments in human history.
US destroyed Fallujah as it tries to destroy the rest of Iraq
The lesson is clear.
Those people who may be honorable and distinguished in their chosen profession should always make decisions based upon good rather than evil no matter where their nominal allegiances may rest.
Justice O'Connor was quoted to have said something to the affect that she abhorred the thought of Bush losing the 2000 election to Gore.
She was known to have wanted to retire after the 2000 election for same reason she is now retiring.
She wanted to spend more time with her sick husband.
Unfortunately, she tarnished her distinguished career with the deciding vote in Bush v. Gore by going along with the partisan majority of the Court to interfere with a democratic election that she and the majority feared would be lost in an honest recount.
She dishonored herself and the Supreme Court by succumbing to party allegiances and not The Constitution to which she swore to uphold.
And the constitutional argument she and the majority used to justify their decision was the Equal Protection Clause.
The Equal Protection Clause was the ultimate basis for the decision, but the majority essentially admitted (what was obvious in any event) that it was not basing its conclusion on any general view of what equal protection requires.
The decision in Bush v Gore was not dictated by the law in any sense—either the law found through research, or the law as reflected in the kind of intuitive sense that comes from immersion in the legal culture.
The Equal Protection clause is generally used in matters concerning civil rights.
The majority ignored their basic conservative views supporting federalism and states' rights in order to justify their decision.
History will haunt these justices down for their utter lack of justice and the hypocrisy associated with this decision.
Sheldon Drobny is Co-founder of Air America Radio.

U.S. Bombing of Fallujah
— the Third World War continued: Chechnya, North Ossetia, Ingushetia


More atrocities - Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying

al-Sadr City

Iraq's real WMD crime - the effects of depleted uranium

World War Two soldiers did not kill Kill ratio Korea, Vietnam. Iraq.

Afghanistan - Terror?

Photos over past three months.

Aid agencies compromised by US actions
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq — Most Recent
Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the US 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.   Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013
Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.   More than 6,500 veteran suicides are logged every year — more than the total number of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since those wars began.
Mary Coghill Kirkland said she asked her son, 21-year-old Army Spc. Derrick Kirkland, what was wrong as soon as he came back from his first deployment to Iraq in 2008.   He had a ready answer: "Mom, I'm a murderer."
A military base on the brink
As police agents watched he shot himself in the head
Murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug overdoses
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq II
U.S. Soldier Killed Herself After Objecting to Interrogation Techniques
Private Gary Boswell, 20, from Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, was found hanging in a playground in July
She is Jeanne "Linda" Michel, a Navy medic.   She came home last month to her husband and three kids ages 11, 5, and 4, delighted to be back in her suburban home of Clifton Park in upstate New York.   Two weeks after she got home, she shot and killed herself.
Peterson refused to participate in the torture after only two nights working in the unit known as the cage
     United States Numb to Iraq Troop Deaths       
     All papers relating to the interrogations have been destroyed     
      We stripped them and were supposed to mock them and degrade their manhood     
US soldiers committing suicide Iraq Vietnam

The Iraq War - complete listing of articles, includes images

The House of Saud and Bush

       All with U.S. Money:       
       US and Israel War Crimes       

All with U.S. Money:

Israel agents stole identity of New Zealand cerebral palsy victim.

(IsraelNN.com July 15, 2004) The Foreign Ministry will take steps towards restoring relations with New Zealand. New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark today announced she was implementing diplomatic sanctions after two Israelis were sentenced on charges of attempting to obtain illegal passports. Despite Israeli refusal to respond to the accusations, the two are labeled in the New Zealand media as Mossad agents acting on behalf of the Israeli intelligence community.

Foreign Ministry officials stated they will do everything possible to renew diplomatic ties, expressing sorrow over the "unfortunate incident".

Projected mortality rate of Sudan refugee starvation deaths — Darfur pictures

Suicide now top killer of Israeli soldiers

Atrocities files - graphic images

'Suicide bombings,' the angel said, 'and beheadings.'

'And the others that have all the power - they fly missiles in the sky.

They don't even look at the people they kill.'

       The real Ronald Reagan       
       — Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, South Africa        

Follow the torture trail...
       Cowardly attacks by air killing men women and children in their homes, often never seeing those they kill as the drones or aircraft fly back to the cowardly bases       
       If they kill only the husband, see how they care for the family they have destroyed       
       Afghanistan — Western Terror States: Canada, US, UK, France, Germany, Italy       
       Photos of Afghanistan people being killed and injured by NATO     
        When you talk with God        
         were you also spending your time, money and energy, killing people?         
       Are they now alive or dead?       
Photos July 2004
US Debt
Photos June 2004
Lest we forget - Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying
Photos May 2004

American military: Abu Gharib (Ghraib) prison photos, humiliation and torture
- London Daily Mirror article: non-sexually explicit pictures
Photos April 2004
The celebration of Jerusalem day, the US missiles that rained onto children in Gaza,
and, a gathering of top articles over the past nine months
Photos March 2004
The Iraq War - complete listing of articles, includes images
Photos February 2004
US missiles - US money - and Palestine
Photos January 2004
Ethnic cleansing in the Beduin desert
Photos December 2003
Shirin Ebadi Nobel Peace Prize winner 2003
Photos November 2003
Photos October 2003
Aljazeerah.info
Photos September 2003
Atrocities - graphic images...
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